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April 10, 2012

Why the NYPD is turning on their bosses

Today's long read. Why the NYPD Is Turning on Ray Kelly -- New York Magazine
Last year ended with a spate of unpleasant Police Department headlines. On Staten Island, an officer was caught on tape bragging he’d “fried another nigger,” then pleaded guilty to extortion and civil-rights charges. In Brooklyn, eight current and former cops were arrested by the FBI for smuggling guns, among other charges. The nasty run continued: In March, a Washington Heights cop was convicted of a gunpoint sexual assault. The NYPD was also increasingly under attack for the tactics it has used to drive crime down to historical lows and to head off terrorist strikes. City Council members, prospective mayoral candidates, and �civil-liberties groups have flailed the NYPD for stopping and frisking thousands of innocent black and Latino New Yorkers; a series of Associated Press stories has explored the department’s far-reaching surveillance of Muslim neighborhoods. But while those debates raise important questions, they are largely about policy choices that can be either altered or continued by the next mayor and police commissioner. And the spate of outright criminal behavior by cops, ugly as it was, was not particularly aberrant: Any large organization is going to employ a handful of miscreants, and every police era has its share of corruption. More worrisome, to the functioning of the department and the maintenance of public safety, now and in the future, was the anger rumbling just below the surface of the NYPD—and, on a couple of occasions, bursting out into plain view. In September, cops contributed to a Facebook discussion on the raucous West Indian Day parade that labeled marchers “animals” and “savages.” In October, scores of cops converged on the Bronx County courthouse as sixteen of their colleagues were arraigned on ticket-fixing charges, waving signs reading JUST FOLLOWING ORDERS and some wearing T-shirts that said IMPROVING EVERYONE'S QUALITY OF LIFE BUT OUR OWN. The accumulation of woes and discontent made it look as if Commissioner Ray Kelly was suffering from something more than third-term drift. It looked as if he were losing control of his department.

April 06, 2012

New York bans sex offenders from online gaming

No word on if this is just pedophiles, or if it also includes people arrested for public urination, indecency, or being a minor and taking nude photos of yourself. This just seems like another tired attempt to demonize people who in theory have already paid their debt to society. If we're going to do this, we should follow through on other crimes, too. People convicted of gun offenses should be banned from owning firearms or playing games that involve forearms or drawing pictures of firearms. White collar criminals involved in financial shenanigans (so, all of Wall Street and every bank employee involved in mass forgeries like robosigning) should be banned from working in finance or from touching money. If a criminal uses the internet to commit a crime, they should be banned from communicating with other people for ever and ever. Right? I mean, we have to protect the children from hearing a convicted sex offender call them a noob during a Call of Duty match. If we don't, the terrorists win. New York State Attorney General Announces Purge of Sex Offenders From Online Games - Forbes
New York State[/entity] Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced a sweeping purge of registered sex offenders from online worlds Thursday. In what’s being called Operation: Game Over, his office is cooperating with entertainment giants Microsoft, Disney, Apple, Blizzard, Electronic Arts, Warner Bros. and Sony. “We must ensure online video game systems do not become a digital playground for dangerous predators. That means doing everything possible to block sex offenders from using gaming networks as a vehicle to prey on underage victims,” said Schneiderman in a statement. “I applaud all the companies participating in this first-of-its-kind initiative for taking online safety seriously and purging their networks of sex offenders. Together we are making the online community safer for our children, not allowing it to become a 21st century crime scene.”