1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110  |  111  |  112  |  113  |  114  |  115  |  116  |  117  |  118  |  119  |  120  |  121  |  122  |  123  |  124  |  125  |  126 

April 28, 2012

Innocent man freed from 25 years in Texas prison after hidden evidence comes to light

Our criminal justice system relies on both sides sharing evidence so that the strongest possible case for both sides can be built. Hiding exculpatory evidence is an absolute perversion of justice. When cops do this, they should be fired. They were so sure the husband did it--because they didn't like the way he expressed grief--that they hid all the evidence that pointed to the real killer. The real killer who went on to kill again. Because these cops did not do their jobs. It's alarming how often we hear these stories about people freed from decades in prison because of police railroading, people who are murdered by the state despite strong evidence of their innocence, of states trying to make it harder for convicted criminals to request DNA tests. It points to a system more concerned with statistics and closing cases than a system concerned with anything resembling justice. Today In Texas Justice - Lawyers, Guns & Money : Lawyers, Guns & Money
This story of another innocent man exonerated after 25 years in prison because of suppressed evidence (while the man who killed his wife was left free to kill at least one other person) contains an excellent of example of the kind of “evidence” that seems to frequently come up when innocent people have been convicted: “There were a lot of cars in the street. There was a big yellow crime-scene ribbon around our house,” he says. “Neighbors were across the street, clustered on the corner … talking to each other, and of course, when my truck comes racing up, they all kind of key on me.” Boutwell met Morton outside the front door and, in front of everyone, bluntly told him Christine Morton was dead, murdered in their bedroom. Morton reeled. “You really don’t know how you’re going to react until it happens to you, and with me, I remember it was as if I was … falling inside myself,” he says. Morton was stunned, nearly mute, which fueled the sheriff’s suspicions and became a major prosecution touchstone at his trial. The fact that Morton didn’t cry out or weep became evidence that he didn’t love his wife and had killed her. . . .

April 24, 2012

Mayor Quan's police strategy a total failure, crime up 21% in Oakland

Her plan was to refocus police attention on the 100 blocks of Oakland where most serious crimes statistically take place. This would concentrate the cops in a few neighborhoods in East and West Oakland while in theory removing police from the tonier parts of town. (Though Quan denies any police were relocated, which is transparently false.) But a funny thing happened: people who had been committing crimes in those 100 blocks . . . went elsewhere. And committed crimes. Shocking, I know. It's like they somehow knew that there would be more cops in certain neighborhoods and fewer cops in others. 100 blocks in Oakland to see fewer police
Six months after Oakland Mayor Jean Quan vowed to shower what she called the most violent blocks of Oakland with extra police and social services, the Police Department says it will reduce the number of officers in those areas. The move comes weeks after residents in the Oakland hills criticized Quan's crime plan, known as the 100-block plan, saying it had resulted in a decrease in officers in their wealthier neighborhoods, which were seeing an uptick in burglaries. It also comes as police reveal that the crime rate for the city's most serious crimes - including homicides, robberies and burglaries - is up 21 percent compared with this same time last year. Last year, Oakland reassigned 22 police officers from their community policing beats, including several from hills neighborhoods, to crime-reduction teams working on violence reduction. Much of that violence reduction work took place in the areas of East and West Oakland designated under Quan's 100-block program, which she unveiled in October as her solution to the city's violent crime problem. . . .