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Mother calls police after finding our her teenage daughter had been hired as a stripper, police arrest the *mom*

She called them. They arrest her. Because her daughter got a job as a stripper. Which she knew about, because when she found out she called the cops. She has been sentenced to THREE YEARS IN PRISON. And is now a registered sex offender. Ore. mom sentenced to prison for letting daughter, 17, work as stripper - Crimesider - CBS News
(CBS/AP) SALEM, Ore. - An Oregon woman was sentenced to three years in prison for letting her 17-year-old daughter work as a stripper. Christina Marie Lopez of Salem pleaded guilty Wednesday to attempted use of a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct. The issue came to light in December when the 42-year-old Lopez complained to police and media that a strip club had hired her underage daughter. The Statesman Journal reports Investigators later obtained surveillance video from the business "that showed Lopez in the club watching her daughter dance and providing her money," according to Lt. Steve Birr, with Salem police. Lopez's daughter, now 18-year-old Nicole Madril, said her mother was not at the club to watch her dance. "It's not like she came in there and got 50 lap dances from me," said Madril. "She came in and gave me money so I could get myself something to eat." Detectives later arrested Lopez at her home.

May 04, 2012

This Day in Labor History: May 4, 1886 -- The Haymarket Square Riot

The men convicted and hanged for the Haymarket bombing were likely innocent. The police had no evidence and six of the men were nowhere near the riot. No one knows who threw the bomb. The police didn't care. They just rounded up the local heads of the labor movement and railroaded them all the way to the gallows. This Day in Labor History: May 4, 1886 - Lawyers, Guns & Money : Lawyers, Guns & Money
On March 4, 1886, during a protest march against police brutality in Chicago’s Haymarket Square, a bomb went off in the middle of a group of policemen, killing 7 officers. The aftermath of the Haymarket bombing showed the fear American capitalists had of working-class ideologies, the lack of civil liberties during the Gilded Age, and the tenuousness of labor organizations during these years of class formation. The mid-1880s saw the native-born working class struggling to understand the new labor system of the Gilded Age. With the promises of mutually respectful employer-employee relations at the center of early Republican free labor ideology shown to be a farce and workers living increasing desperate lives in dirty and dangerous factories and condemned to poverty, the American working-class sought to even the playing field between employer and employee. The Knights of Labor promised the eight-hour day; in a period when labor looked for a single panacea to solve all problems rather than a deep class analysis of labor-employer relations, the working-class jumped to the idea. The Knights, led by Terence Powderly, grew rapidly in the mid-1880s, even though Powderly didn’t really envision the organization as a radical challenge to capitalism. Still, “Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Sleep, Eight Hours for What You Will” became the slogan for a million or more Americans. But Powderly’s control over the organization was tenuous and with the Knights defined as open to all workers, it meant that anarchists and other radicals could easily join and then try to convert workers to their cause. The center of 8-hour organizing was in Chicago, where small numbers of radicals began organizing workers to demand the 8-hour day and threaten a general strike if denied. On May 1, 1886, between 300,000 and 500,000 workers walked off their job around the nation. Probably 80,000 of those workers were in Chicago. The police responded with sadly predictable violence. On May 3, police murdered 6 strikers at the McCormick Harvesting Machine plant. The McCormick workers had been battling with their employer for a year, who had hired Pinkertons to beat them. They combined their already existing struggle with the 8-hour day to become some of the most respected working-class militants in the city. Responding to the murders, labor called a march to protest police violence the next day at Haymarket Square, which somewhere between 1000-3000 people attended. . . .