1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110  |  111  |  112  |  113  |  114  |  115  |  116  |  117  |  118  |  119  |  120  |  121  |  122  |  123  |  124  |  125  |  126 

June 15, 2012

In Oakland, police routinely have a three-hour response time for emergencies

Also a report was issued this week strongly condemning Mayor Quan's 100 Block strategy as being baseless and ignorant of reality. Actual research showed that the 100 blocks she picked as containing 90% of the city's serious crimes actually accounted for less than 20% of the crime. And so by focusing so much manpower on those 100 blocks, crime flourished elsewhere. In order to achieve her goals, she would have had to focus on nearly 700 blocks scattered across the city. In Oakland, learning to live with crime
Oakland resident Beth Maher arrived home around 10 p.m. one day last week to find her husband and their three kids standing outside in the yard. They had called 911 about 90 minutes earlier when they found the front door to their Temescal neighborhood home kicked in - and they were still waiting for police to arrive. Unsure whether anyone was still inside the house, the Mahers called police again at 10 p.m. A dispatcher told them there were 109 calls ahead of them, including nine priority calls - and a hostage situation. That's when the Maher parents decided to enter their home without police assistance. The police did eventually show up: They left a sticky note on the couple's door at 1:40 a.m. "I feel like there is nobody to turn to," Beth Maher said. "We're on our own." It's a scene and sentiment repeated time and again in neighborhoods all over Oakland. Oakland's homicides and shootings grab the headlines and lead the local TV news, and the ferocity and frequency of the violence drown out the robberies and burglaries that occur day and night. As a result, the community standard for what constitutes significant crime has been turned askew in Oakland. . . . Maher, however, remains skeptical that installing an alarm system will prove to be much of a deterrent without police participation. "We would get an alarm, but alarms only work if the police come," Maher pointed out. "Isn't that the point of an alarm?"

June 04, 2012

Mayor Bloomberg's war on drug users

Because clearly arresting every person who has a tiny bit of pot is the most important function for the NYPD. When they aren't beating protesters, perjuring themselves about beating protesters, or spying on every Muslim in the tri-state area, that is. National - Ta-Nehisi Coates - Mayor Bloomberg's War - The Atlantic
The police in New York City made 50,684 arrests last year for possession of a small amount of marijuana, more than for any other offense, according to an analysis of state data by Harry G. Levine, a sociologist at Queens College. The arrests continued -- one in seven arrests made in the city was for low-level marijuana possession -- even as Commissioner Kelly issued his directive. Mr. Bloomberg has opposed ending arrests for the possession of small amounts of marijuana. His administration has argued that the arrests serve to reduce more serious crime by deterring drug dealing and the violence that can accompany the drug trade. A spokesman for the mayor declined to comment Sunday... More than a dozen states have decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana, including Connecticut last year and California the year before. In New York, the Legislature in 1977 reduced the penalty for possession of 25 grams or less of marijuana to a violation, which carries a maximum fine of $100 for first-time offenders. But it remains a misdemeanor if the marijuana is in public view or is being smoked in public, and lawmakers and drug-reform advocates have argued that the misdemeanor charge is often unfairly applied to suspects who did not have marijuana in public view until the police stopped them and told them to empty their pockets. "Now it's in public view," Professor Levine said. "If you go by the police reports, all around New York City, there are people standing around with their palms outstretched with a bit of marijuana in them." From 2002 to 2011, New York City recorded 400,000 low-level marijuana arrests, according to his analysis. That represented more arrests than under Mr. Bloomberg's three predecessors put together -- a period of 24 years. Most of those arrested have been young black and Hispanic men, and most had no prior criminal convictions.