1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110  |  111  |  112  |  113  |  114  |  115  |  116  |  117  |  118  |  119  |  120  |  121  |  122  |  123  |  124  |  125  |  126 

August 24, 2012

The NYPD's massive domestic anti-Muslim spy network has lead to zero terror arrests or cases

Which is good news! American Muslims are not plotting anything! Hurray! But then you have to realize that the NYPD acted--probably--illegally by spying on so many innocent people in New York and New Jersey. And it was a massive waste of money and talent. The Associated Press: NYPD: Muslim spying led to no leads, terror cases
NEW YORK (AP) — In more than six years of spying on Muslim neighborhoods, eavesdropping on conversations and cataloguing mosques, the New York Police Department's secret Demographics Unit never generated a lead or triggered a terrorism investigation, the department acknowledged in court testimony unsealed late Monday. The Demographics Unit is at the heart of a police spying program, built with help from the CIA, which assembled databases on where Muslims lived, shopped, worked and prayed. Police infiltrated Muslim student groups, put informants in mosques, monitored sermons and catalogued every Muslim in New York who adopted new, Americanized surnames. Police hoped the Demographics Unit would serve as an early warning system for terrorism. And if police ever got a tip about, say, an Afghan terrorist in the city, they'd know where he was likely to rent a room, buy groceries and watch sports. But in a June 28 deposition as part of a longstanding federal civil rights case, Assistant Chief Thomas Galati said none of the conversations the officers overheard ever led to a case. "Related to Demographics," Galati testified that information that has come in "has not commenced an investigation." The NYPD is the largest police department in the nation and Mayor Michael Bloomberg has held up its counterterrorism tactics as a model for the rest of the country. After The Associated Press began reporting on those tactics last year, supporters argued that the Demographics Unit was central to keeping the city safe. Galati testified that it was an important tool, but conceded it had not generated any leads. . . .

August 19, 2012

St. Louis jail guards busted for forcing prisoners to fight in gladiator ring

Inmates Forced Into Gladiator-Style Fighting By St. Louis Jail Guards | ThinkProgress
A group of current and former inmates filed a federal lawsuit against the St. Louis city workhouse on Friday, claiming guards forced them to fight each other in gladiator-style combat. The class-action suit claims guards took away inmates’ food and privileges and attacked them if they refused to fight. The “Workhouse Gladiators” say they were also denied medical care for the serious injuries resulting from the fights, which included a broken jaw. They are seeking injunctive relief along with $100 million in punitive damages, and their attorneys are also requesting to get the inmates transferred out of the jail immediately for their safety. The lawsuit was filed after security cameras caught officers Dexter Brinson and Elvis Howard forcing two of the plaintiffs to fight. Brinson and Howard were arrested in June.

August 08, 2012

New York Times photographer beaten by police for legally taking pictures of an arrest

New York Times Photographer Beaten Up And Arrested By NYPD | ThinkProgress
New York Times photographer Robert Stolarik was allegedly beaten up and arrested by NYPD officers for taking pictures of an arrest Sunday night. While on an assignment in the Bronx, Stolarik took pictures of an NYPD officer arresting a 16-year-old girl. He says an officer slammed his camera into his face when they learned he was a journalist, and dragged him to the ground and kicked him after he asked for their badge numbers. He was then charged with obstructing government administration and with resisting arrest. The NYPD defended the officers, saying Stolarik “inadvertently” struck an officer in the face with a camera and “violently resisted being handcuffed.” The New York Times has a video showing Stolarik face down on the sidewalk, surrounded by a huddle of about six officers. Lawyers for the National Press Photographers Association asked the NYPD to return $18,000 worth of cameras and press credentials seized by the officers. Stolarik was previously arrested while covering an Occupy Wall Street protest.