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December 27, 2014

Cop claims that every other cop carries throwaway weapons to plant on people in ermegencies

Paperwork is hard. If a cop kills an innocent American, it's the American's fault and the only recourse a cop has is to frame the innocent victim. Throw-away Weapons: A Cop Insurance Policy or an Abuse of Power? - Guns.com
By way of an example, what would happen if an officer were confronted with an assailant aiming a toy pistol at the officer? The answer would be that the officer would hopefully aim for center-mass, thereby ending the perceived threat. Well, okay, but that’s when the officer’s troubles begin. The very next step would be for the officer to face his or her internal affairs division’s investigations. “What, you mean even in the dark you couldn’t tell that the gun was really a plastic toy?“ There would sure to be a judicial review board, followed, at the very minimum, by a lengthy unpaid suspension, a stain on the officer’s perhaps otherwise stellar personnel record, thereby preventing future promotions, perhaps even termination, perhaps even criminal prosecution with the possibility of incarceration. So what were those aforementioned preparations put in place by some very well-meaning veteran officers? Well, many, if not most, carried, what became known as, “throw-away weapons.” Those weapons had any and all possible serial numbers removed, were impossible to trace back to the officers, and were concealable. The weapons in question ranged from switchblades to daggers, derringers to small caliber two-inch revolvers, to the smallest of semi-automatic pistols, and just about anything else thrown in for good measure. The common denominator was that they could all be used if and when the unimaginable were to happen. In the case of the plastic toy gun, in the frantic seconds after the fact, the throw-away derringer, sans serial numbers, could be substituted for that toy gun, thereby ensuring that disciplinary actions would be prevented. And just where does one acquire such a strange and assorted mix of weapons? Well, if you work on the streets long enough, they just somehow place themselves in your hands. You come across those items on nearly a daily basis, and not all of them get turned over to the evidence division.

October 04, 2014

Chicago cop tortured and burned over 100 innocent men, receives only 4 years in jail

Chicago cop tortured and burned over 100 innocent men, receives only 4 years in jail Jon Burge, ex-Chicago cop who ran torture ring, released from prison | MSNBC
A former Chicago police commander who for decades ran a torture ring that used electrical shock, burning and beatings on more than 100 black men has been released from federal prison after spending less than four years behind bars. Jon Burge was transferred to a Florida halfway house on Thursday, reigniting the nightmares of many of his victims. Burge and his crew of detectives terrorized the city’s predominantly black South Side throughout the 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s. In 2010, long after the statute of limitations had expired for his many vile acts, Burge was convicted of perjury for lying about police torture that he oversaw. He was sentenced to four and a half years in prison for that charge alone.

August 26, 2014

Coroner Claims Black Man Shot Himself in Chest With Hands Cuffed Behind Back While In Police Car

A culture of sanctioned murder by police? Whatever do you mean? Coroner: Black Man Shot Himself in Chest With Hands Cuffed Behind Back
According to a coroner's report obtained by NBC News, Victor White, a 22-year-old black man, committed suicide in the back of a police car by shooting himself in the chest while his hands were cuffed behind his back. The report contradicts the official police account, which said White shot himself in the back. White died March 3rd in New Iberia, Louisiana, after a night spent hanging out with friends. He was stopped by police along with an acquaintance, Isaiah Lewis, on the way back from buying cigars at a local gas station. Cops found a small amount of pot on White during a pat-down, then ran the two men's names through a database and called for backup. A second search yielded a small amount of cocaine, and White was arrested and placed into an Iberia Parrish police cruiser, where he allegedly produced a .25 caliber semi-automatic handgun and shot himself in the right side of the chest. The story and the new coroner's report raise several questions about the incident. One friend said White joked about having a gun earlier that night, but no one is on record as having seen one. If he did have a gun, why didn't police find it during one of the two searches? How was he able to reach around and shoot himself in the chest with his hands cuffed behind his back? (The coroner's report said it was possible due to White's "body habitus.") Why did police initially claim he shot himself in the back? Why didn't the coroner find the gunpowder stippling common to close-range shots on White's wound? White had a laceration on his face at the time of his death that Lewis said wasn't there the last time two men saw each other, before White got into the cruiser. Where did it come from?