1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87 

October 08, 2010

Student finds FBI tracking device on his car

Within 24 hours of posting about the device on Reddit the FBI were at his door, asking for the device back and harassing hm. Report: Arab-American Student Finds FBI Tracking Device On His Car | TPMMuckraker
According to a report on Wired.com, a 20-year-old Arab-American college student was visited by several FBI agents after he found and removed an apparent government tracking device from his car. The student, Yasir Afifi, told Wired he found the device on his car after taking it to a mechanic. He removed the device and posted a photo of it online (which you can see at the left). Then, he says, he got a visit from FBI agents. The FBI has refused to comment on an "ongoing investigation." But according to Afifi, several agents showed up at his California apartment a few days after the photos were posted. Readers had identified it as a tracking device that's only sold to law enforcement agencies. "We're here to recover the device you found on your vehicle. It's federal property. It's an expensive piece, and we need it right now," one agent said. When Afifi asked if they had put it there, the man, who identified himself as Vincent said, "Yeah, I put it there. We're going to make this much more difficult for you if you don't cooperate."

October 07, 2010

Innocent man sues U.S. military after seven years of torture, confinement

Ex-detainee sues the U.S., saying captors tortured him
A Syrian man released from the prison at Guantanamo Bay last year sued the U.S. military Wednesday, saying that he was the victim of a "Kafkaesque nightmare" in which he was tortured by al-Qaeda after being accused of being U.S. spy, liberated, then tortured by the Americans, who held him for seven more years by mistake. Abdul Rahim Abdul Razak al-Janko, 32, who has been resettled outside the United States, filed suit Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Washington, the court that ordered his release in June 2009. At the time, U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon concluded that the U.S. government's case for holding Janko "defies common sense." Janko was tortured by al-Qaeda and imprisoned by the Taliban for 18 months on suspicion of being a spy for the United States or Israel. Leon found no evidence that the Syrian was loyal to either group.

October 06, 2010

The .ly domain space to be considered unsafe

The bit.ly link shortener is about to die, and tens of thousands of links are going with it. The .ly domain space to be considered unsafe | :Ben Metcalfe Blog
The domain was seized by the Libyan domain registry for reasons which seemed to be kept obscure until we escalated the issue. We eventually discovered that the domain has been seized because the content of our website, in their opinion, fell outside of Libyan Islamic/Sharia Law. This is deeply concerning for everyone, but especially .ly domain owners, because it sets a precedent that all websites running on a .ly domain must comply with Libyan Islamic/Sharia Law in order to maintain their domains. This is especially concerning for anyone running a url shortener or hosting user-generated content on a .ly domain. You may also not know that since June 2010 .ly domains less than 4 characters long may no longer be registered by anyone who isn’t in Libya – which suggests there is tension around foreign owned, high-value, short .ly domains.

September 29, 2010

Anderson Cooper interviews Assistant AG Shirvell about his stalking of gay U of M student

Skip ahead to 3:30 for when Shirvell appears. A singularly peculiar Assistant Attorney General - Roger Ebert's Journal