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May 13, 2009

Twitter on the #fixreplies controversy -- sorry, out of order

One used to be able to "listen" to half the conversation on a personal message between your twitter friend and their friend you don'f follow. As of Tuesday, you can't. Twits are enraged, as they used to find cool friends of friends this way. First explanation: This is better, trust us. Second explanation: The thing's broke, okay? Wait for a new thing. Twitter’s Response to #fixreplies: We Can’t
Twitter has responded to the #fixreplies controversy today, in which a number of vocal users have objected to a forced feature-removal.... Originally, Twitter said they were disabling the feature because it was confusing, although in fairness the only people who had it turned on were those who had chosen to. Today, however, Twitter adds that this isn’t the whole story: the engineering team says the feature had to be removed for technical reasons. From the Twitter blog:
Whoa, Feedback! We’re getting a ton of extremely useful feedback about yesterday’s update to Settings. The engineering team reminded me that there were serious technical reasons why that setting had to go or be entirely rebuilt—it wouldn’t have lasted long even if we thought it was the best thing ever. Nevertheless, it’s amazing to wake up and see all the tweets about this change. We’re hearing your feedback and reading through it all. One of the strongest signals is that folks were using this setting to discover and follow new and interesting accounts—this is something we absolutely want to support. Our product, design, user experience, and technical teams have started brainstorming a way to surface a new, scalable way to address this need.

May 12, 2009

A Song of Ice and Fire the video game?

The Escapist : News : A Song of Ice and Fire Game In The Works

French studio Cyanide (developers of Blood Bowl) recently announced their partnership with Martin to create the games, which will appear on consoles and PC. The studio is working "in collaboration with George R.R. Martin," and says that "development has begun."

What exactly it has begun on remains a mystery, but anyone who's even read a few pages of these books should know that there's a lot of material to mine. Also, Cyanide says that the series' compelling themes and extensive cast of characters make it "an ideal background for numerous genres of video games," so who knows, we might be getting more than RPGs.

"We are all huge fans of A Song of Ice and Fire, so it is a true honor for our teams to be entrusted with creating the first video games inspired by this masterpiece," Patrick Pligersdorffer, managing director of Cyanide, said. "The twists and turns of the plot will allow us to deliver an experience which can be enjoyed by both long-time fans as well as gamers new to the series."

How To: Make Working Keyboard Pants

DIY semi-funtional keyboard pants destined for the geek catwalk

May 11, 2009

Scott McCloud hates the Kindle

Scott McCloud | Journal -- I Will Beat this Horse Again and Again until it RISES FROM THE DEAD

He makes an interesting point.

What’s the default shape of our art forms?

Cinema is wider than it is tall. TV is wider than it is tall. Theater is wider than it is tall. Laptop and desktop monitors are wider than they are tall. In fact, with the advent of widescreen TVs, there’s little difference in the shapes. They’re all around 3x5 or 4x5 range. Wider than tall. All of them.

And print? Well, print is taller than it is wide right? The printed page is the exception to the rule, isn’t it?

Wrong.

The default shape of print is not taller than wide. It’s wider than tall just like all the rest, because the default shape of print is two pages side-by-side. And the reason is the same reason as the shape of TV and cinema and theater and surfing and all the rest: because we have two eyes next to each other, not one on top of the other.

How To: Build a Solar iPhone/iPod Charger

How to make a solar iPod/iPhone charger -aka MightyMintyBoost

May 09, 2009

Science! Control a computer by playing in mud

Tom Gerhardt | Mud Tub

By sloshing, squishing, pulling, punching, etc, in a tub of mud (yes, wet dirt), users control games, simulators, and expressive tools; interacting with a computer in a new, completely organic, way. Born out of a motivation to close the gap between our bodies and the digital world, the Mud Tub frees the traditional computer interaction model of it’s rigidity, allowing humans to use their highly developed sense of touch, and creative thinking skills in a more natural way.

The Mud Tub occupies a space similar to other experimental human-computer interfaces, like, multi-touch surfaces, body controllers, augmented reality systems, etc, which push the boundaries of codified interaction models, and drive the development of innovative software applications. Beyond its role as a research topic, the Mud Tub also exists as an open-sourced hardware/software platform on which interactive artists and designers explore new methods for creating and displaying their work.

May 07, 2009

ZeFrank has an iPhone app for hard times

Hard Times With Ze Frank: Free iPhone App [VIDEO]

HardTimes :: iFingrU from ze frank on Vimeo.