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Google explains their plan to kill Net Neutrality

Google proposes separate rules for wireless Web Google proposes that gamers, people who want health data transmitted over the internet, and anything new be exempt from Net Neutrality rules (which don't exist yet, of course) and so will cost extra. They also think that when mobile devices access the internet it's somehow magickally a different internet (it's not) and so should cost more. This is bullshit.
Verizon Communications Inc. and Google Inc. urged U.S. regulators to leave wireless Internet services outside most policies that are designed to prevent carriers from making some websites perform better than others. The companies issued a "compromise proposal" for so-called net-neutrality rules. The plan would restrict Internet service providers from selectively slowing content that travels over their wires, but wouldn't apply such limits to Web use on mobile devices, according to a blog post by the companies Monday. They would also exempt new offerings beyond traditional Internet and TV services, such as health care monitoring. Google and Verizon argue that the mobile Internet market is more competitive and changing rapidly, and therefore different from the wireline market. Critics say the proposal would let Verizon and other carriers discriminate against certain traffic, possibly favoring their own services.

That's why they call it computer science -- The First Church of Robotics

Op-Ed Contributor - The First Church of Robotics - NYTimes.com
... computer scientists are human, and are as terrified by the human condition as anyone else. We, the technical elite, seek some way of thinking that gives us an answer to death, for instance. ... All thoughts about consciousness, souls and the like are bound up equally in faith, which suggests something remarkable: What we are seeing is a new religion, expressed through an engineering culture.... But if technology were presented without metaphysical baggage, is it possible that modernity would not make people as uncomfortable? Technology is essentially a form of service. We work to make the world better.... But civility, human improvement, these are still choices. That’s why scientists and engineers should present technology in ways that don’t confound those choices. We serve people best when we keep our religious ideas out of our work.

August 09, 2010

How To: Screw Over Artists

A producer of flash games has advice on how to underpay artists. What a champ! With special commentary by Colleen Doran. “Keep them in the dark” — what some very bad publishers are really thinking--The Beat
How to find an artist: I recommend looking through art sites such as Deviantart for an artist which suits your taste, or any other site that has a decent art community such as Newgrounds. There’s a few reasons you want to find an artist this way. First of all, they’re cheaper. These guys aren’t used to making a lot of money for their work so they will be more appreciative of the chance even if they are being payed slightly less than what professionals are payed. Second of all, they’re better. The quality of art you can find through this method is pretty amazing, and the vast amount of artists guarantee you will find something that suits your tastes and needs. Unless you have a specific price you want to pay in mind, ask THEM what they are willing to charge for the project. This usually causes people to give offers that are lower than what you normally pay, and will make them happy. How NOT to find an artist: Do not look for either professional artists, or an artist that has done a lot of game design work in the past. The problem with artists who do this as their full time job is that they’re usually expensive. Compared to what you can find through art sites, these guys tend to cost an arm and a leg. Artists who have done a lot of game design work are also bad for a similar reason, they know how much flash games can earn so they expect a decent percentage of the profit. It’s ridiculous to pay something 50% of a sponsorship when you can find someone else who would accept $500 for the same job. When your game sells for $10,000, the difference in cost is a multitude of 10.

August 05, 2010

Google & Verizon making deal to kill Net Neutrality

Google and Verizon in Talks on Selling Internet Priorit - NYTimes.com
WASHINGTON — Google and Verizon, two leading players in Internet service and content, are nearing an agreement that could allow Verizon to speed some online content to Internet users more quickly if the content’s creators are willing to pay for the privilege. The charges could be paid by companies, like YouTube, owned by Google, for example, to Verizon, one of the nation’s leading Internet service providers, to ensure that its content received priority as it made its way to consumers. The agreement could eventually lead to higher charges for Internet users. Such an agreement could overthrow a once-sacred tenet of Internet policy known as net neutrality, in which no form of content is favored over another. In its place, consumers could soon see a new, tiered system, which, like cable television, imposes higher costs for premium levels of service. Any agreement between Verizon and Google could also upend the efforts of the Federal Communications Commission to assert its authority over broadband service, which was severely restricted by a federal appeals court decision in April.