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November 30, 2010

Comcast declares war on the internet, threatens Netflix

Netflix Partner Says Comcast Fee 'Threatens' Open Internet - NYTimes.com
Level 3 Communications, a central partner in the Netflix online movie service, accused Comcast on Monday of charging a new fee that puts Internet video companies at a competitive disadvantage. Level 3, which helps to deliver Netflix’s streaming movies, said Comcast had effectively erected a tollbooth that “threatens the open Internet,” and indicated that it would seek government intervention. Comcast quickly denied that the clash had anything to do with network neutrality, instead calling it “a simple commercial dispute.” The dispute highlighted the growing importance of Internet video delivery — an area that some people say needs to be monitored more closely by regulators. Net neutrality, which posits that Internet traffic should be free of any interference from network operators like Comcast, is thought to be on the December agenda of the Federal Communications Commission. “With this action, Comcast demonstrates the risk of a ‘closed’ Internet, where a retail broadband Internet access provider decides whether and how their subscribers interact with content,” Thomas C. Stortz, the chief legal officer for Level 3, said in a statement Monday.

November 17, 2010

Classic adventure game Space Quest ported to iPad

Space Quest Ported to iPad in HTML5 | GameLife | Wired.com
You can now play Sierra’s classic sci-fi adventure game, Space Quest: The Sarien Encounter, on your iPad. But there’s no point snooping around the App Store for your nostalgia fix: The game is only available through the tablet’s browser, Safari. Instead of wrangling with Apple over the unofficial port, creator Martin Kool has bypassed the iTunes guardians and revived the game in HTML5 and JavaScript. Point your mobile browser at ipad.sarien.net and you’ll be asked to create a web link to the page on your home screen. Then, a complete version of the 1987 graphic adventure is available to play on your iPad. It’s a largely faithful port, only missing audio because Kool hasn’t “found the time to implement this yet.” It uses prewritten commands, so you don’t have to type anything in, features save games and is, best of all, completely free. More than anything, it’s a very impressive showcase for HTML5.

November 14, 2010

Does Kinect analyze your home and report back to advertisers?

Microsoft says they aren't capturing this data, but at the same time they are telling advertisers that the capability exists. Is Kinect Reporting What It Sees To Advertisers?
Speaking at an investor's conference on Thursday, a Microsoft executive offered that Kinect not only knows how many are in the room when an ad's shown, but what kind of team colors they might be wearing. Uh-oh. Privacy concerns with the Kinect aren't a new subject, of course. At the BMO Capital Markets forum, Dennis Durkin, the chief operating officer of Microsoft's Interactive Entertainment division, offered that if someone were watching a sporting event with Kinect on (for example, ESPN's new streaming service to the Xbox 360), Kinect could deduce what team they support based on what kind of jersey or colors they wore, and serve advertising tailored to that. Digital Trends offers that it's not much different from how Facebook serves its ads, though in that case, there's something of an active opt-in (choosing to publicize your favorite films, food, sports teams, your alma mater, etc.) Durkin's example carries the implication that you don't know you're being watched - basically, studied - for marketing purposes. The results would be aggregated of course - charts and numbers, not a piece of raw video of you saved and stored somewhere - but it still sounds Orwellian.

November 12, 2010

Facebook to offer email

No word yet an how un-private everything you do will be. Facebook Is Launching Email On Monday

Dave-o's book trailer: Build a water rocket in a minute

YouTube - Quick-n-Easy Water Rocket--"Snip, Burn, Solder, Shred" Book Trailer...