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February 07, 2011

Big cats love the iPad

The Escapist : News : Lions and Tigers Play iPad Game for Charity
Hiccup, creator of iPad Game for Cats, has shown its game to some big cats to find out if they like it as much as the small ones do. Aside from promoting its iPad game, Hiccup hopes to help raise some money for the sanctuary where the big cats live. iPad Game for Cats is a simple but ingenious idea: an image of a mouse or a laser pointer dot appears on screen, and moves around under the cat's nose. The cat chases the picture, leaving you free to watch the cat be adorable without actually having to do anything. Hiccup filmed the video at the Conservators' Centre in Mebane, North Caroline. As well as the very recognizable lions and tigers - which come in both regular and white varieties - Hiccup got a tufted-eared caracal, the house-cat sized Geoffroy's cats, and the spotted servels to play the game. They all seemed to like it, or at any rate, it held their attention. To be completely honest, the cats didn't know they were helping to promote a game or that they were soliciting charitable donations, but I think that gives their performance a certain truth it might otherwise have lacked.

February 04, 2011

Not to get all *{squeeeee!}* but OMFG I LOVE THIS VIDEO!!!

YouTube - BADASS LEGO GUNS DISCLOSURE: My publisher, No Starch...

February 01, 2011

How To: Make your own samoa cookies

Homemade Samoas Recipe

Google catches Bing copying their search results

Google: Bing Is Cheating, Copying Our Search Results
Google has run a sting operation that it says proves Bing has been watching what people search for on Google, the sites they select from Google’s results, then uses that information to improve Bing’s own search listings. Bing doesn’t deny this. As a result of the apparent monitoring, Bing’s relevancy is potentially improving (or getting worse) on the back of Google’s own work. Google likens it to the digital equivalent of Bing leaning over during an exam and copying off of Google’s test. “I’ve spent my career in pursuit of a good search engine,” says Amit Singhal, a Google Fellow who oversees the search engine’s ranking algorithm. “I’ve got no problem with a competitor developing an innovative algorithm. But copying is not innovation, in my book.” Bing doesn’t deny Google’s claim.

January 31, 2011

iPad magazines are not very good

iPad Mags Need A New Blueprint
Ever since the iPad came out, print media companies have been feeling their way in this new medium, but so far they’ve just been stumbling over themselves. They are latching onto the iPad as a new walled garden where people will somehow magically pay for articles they can get for free in their browsers. But if they want people to pay, the experience has to be better than on the Web, and usually it’s not. This sorry state of affairs is true for both magazines and newspapers. The New York Times iPad app, for instance, is gorgeous but crippled. All the links are stripped out of the articles, even from the blogs. Meanwhile, most iPad magazines are little more than PDFs of the print issues with some photo slideshows and videos thrown in. They end up being huge files—I recently downloaded a single issue that was 350 MB, some issues of Wired are 500 MB—with the same stale articles as in the print version. Replicating a dead-tree publishing model on a touchscreen is a recipe for obsolescence. Despite the poor reviews and uninspiring number of downloads, media companies sold millions of dollars worth of advertising last year for their iPad apps because advertisers want to be associated with anything shiny and new.