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October 12, 2011

Holy crap! Scribblenauts comes to IOS!

Scribblenauts is fundamentally a game about using a large vocabulary to solve problems. Which is to say, it's perfect. I picked up the DS version of this a year ago after reading Jerry "Tycho" Holkins rave about it on the Penny Arcade. He told a story about his son complaining to him about words missing from the game's incredibly extensive dictionary (seriously, tens of thousands of words) and the words were "toast fork" and "large body of water." His heart swelled with fatherly pride and my curiosity was piqued. The game gives you challenges--feed a zombie; name ten professions that could work in a rustic village; turn this convict into a dragon--and you solve the challenges by writing words. Any words. Nouns and adjectives. And whatever you write, the game creates. It's beautiful in it's simplicity. Though it's easy to fall in love with some words and to over-use them on action challenges. I wrote JETPACK and INVISIBILITY CLOAK so many times you guys. They were the two guns in my holster. Speaking of, I also wrote RAYGUN about fifty times. It's five bucks. And if the IOS remake (with additional levels) is *half* as fun as the DS version it will be a fucking steal. Scribblenauts Remix penciled in for iOS release today | Joystiq
5TH Cell used its magic pen and notebook (actually a bunch of professional programmers, designers, and engineers within its own team and Iron Galaxy Studios, but whatever) to create an iOS version of its innovative DS game Scribblenauts, delivering the complete product to the App Store ... right now. For 5 bucks, you can download the universal app Scribblenauts Remix (so that's what that title is!) featuring the signature gameplay -- writing words to summon objects, then using those objects to solve puzzles. The app is apparently based on Super Scribblenauts, meaning you can punch up your items with adjectives. It even has new iOS-exclusive levels.

October 05, 2011

Posting on Facebook is digital sharecropping

This needs to be said a lot: posting on Facebook instead of on your own blog gives all the power, all the money, all the eyeballs to Facebook. Why Facebook's new Open Graph makes us all part of the web underclass | Technology | guardian.co.uk
When you own a domain you're a first class citizen of the web. A householder and landowner. What you can do on your own website is only very broadly constrained by law and convention. You can post the content you like. You can run the software you want, including software you've written or customised yourself. And you can design it to look the way you want. If you're paying for a web hosting service and you don't like it (or they don't like you) you can pack up your site and move it to another host. Your URLs will stay the same and so your visitors won't notice. You get a great deal of freedom in return for the cost of running your own site. Your site could still be there in a decade's time, possibly even in a century. If you use a paid-for web service at someone else's domain you're a tenant. A second class citizen. You don't have much control. You'll probably have to live with your landlord's furniture and decoration and a restrictive set of rules. Your content will only exist at these URLs for as long as you keep paying the same people that monthly fee and for as long as your provider stays in business. Experience tells me that this isn't very long. As a paying customer you'll have a few rights under your contract, but they probably won't amount to very much. When you leave you'll probably be able to get your data back in a useful format, but when you put it back on the web somewhere else you'll lose all your inbound links, search engine rankings and many of your visitors. This kind of service seems like a good deal until the day you need to move. . . .

October 04, 2011

How To: Peel an entire head of garlic in ten seconds without a knife

How To Peel a Head of Garlic in Less Than 10 Seconds by Saveur