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February 07, 2013

This new app lets you pretend like you're having awesome fun while you're actually at home or at work

A hilarious social hacking of our hipster media streams. Check out that final quote for a chillingly hilarious look at the Onion future we will all be living in. CouchCachet App Gives New Meaning to Lying on the Couch - NYTimes.com
Everyone is out having a great time — no, not just great, an amazing time — and you’re on the couch, hovering on the border between pajamas and underwear. Suddenly, the quick, the beautiful and the fully dressed invade: chirps from phones and pop-ups on screens are announcing their social media check-ins, mapping out the lands of awesome times. None of those places, needless to say, are your living room. Dude0357 has arrived at a loft on Ten Eyck Street, and an arrow onscreen helpfully points out a corner of East Williamsburg succulent with possibility. Goddess0577 has just hit the brand-new Unnamed-Unaddressed-Unmarked Bar whose absolute invisibility has made it the hottest place in the Mission district of San Francisco. These, said Justin Isaf, 29, are just the kinds of virtual anxiety pellets that torment a contented couch potato, whose big exertion of the evening might be finding a clean-enough cup to finish off the half bottle of wine from the day before yesterday that is still drinkable, kind of. “People check into coffee shops, then they tweet pictures of the patterns in the coffee foam,” Mr. Isaf said. “Someone tweeted, ‘Hey, I’m hanging out onstage with the Lumineers!’ ” . . . Now Mr. Fountain, Mr. Isaf and two other friends have come up with an app to ease this malady. Called CouchCachet, the app finds all the coolest places in your neighborhood, then automatically uses Foursquare to check you into them — with none of the irritation of actually leaving the couch. It is, Mr. Fountain said, “a social application that will lie and say you are already doing those things while you sit at home in your pajamas. It’s the only application that increases your social status, while you do nothing at home.” . . . More than simply creating a geo-mirage, CouchCachet will also tweet lyrics by indie bands that people haven’t heard of. “It will wax poetic about local microbrews that you just discovered at some cool speakeasy,” said Mr. Fountain, 36, of Cobble Hill, Brooklyn. “It will also upload low-fi pictures of 20-somethings in skinny jeans to your Instagram.” . . . Suppose, someone asked, a friend using CouchCachet was checked into the same places that CouchCachet has also checked you into? “This is fine!” Mr. Fountain said. “This is robots talking to robots. This is the future.”

January 28, 2013

How To: Make a lockpick from a bra

How to make a Bogota Rake from bra underwire, or Bragota; a how-to.
Let's begin with what this device is and how it is used. A bogota rake is a special variety of lockpick designed by a brilliant lockpicker by the name of Raimundo. He named the pick after the bogota mountains, because of their sharp peaks and rounded valleys. A rake is a term used to describe a lockpick that has peaks and valleys, and is used to manipulate the pins in a lock by 'raking' (moving the pick in and out) against the pins. A bogota rake is used slightly differently, described by Raimundo as a “jittery motion”, as though the user had consumed too much coffee. If you are planning on making these, I will assume you know how to pick a lock already, if not, checkout youtube and search for bogota rake. Take a moment to look at the template above. The advantage of a bogota rake may not be immediately apparent, but using one will make you a true believer. The speed at which most common pin tumbler locks fall prey to this set is extraordinary.

January 25, 2013

Will a wrist-worn rape alarm really help women?

A Wrist-Worn Answer to Sexual Attack? - India Real Time - WSJ
The wrist-borne device, Mr. Sibal said, would, upon the pressing of a button, send a text message to the nearest police station as well as pre-selected family members. A global positioning system within the watch would notify them of the wearer’s coordinates. Mr. Sibal said the government would come up with a prototype by mid-year and then farm the idea out to companies for production. The government has held initial talks on manufacturing the product with state-run telecom equipment maker ITI Ltd.,(523610.BY), according to the government’s release. ITI’s chairman, K.S. Dhingra, confirmed the discussions to India Real Time: “In case the government decides, we are very much interested to manufacture it.” The watch will be sold in two variants, one for $20, the other for around $50, Mr. Sibal said. It also will have an inbuilt video that, upon activation, would shoot for 30 minutes, the minister said. Of course, in an ideal world, long before then, the cavalry would have arrived — in the form of the cops and family to save the day. But how realistic is that? Not very, say women’s safety advocates. And the government’s track record in previous electronic innovations isn’t exactly encouraging.