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March 11, 2008

Panasonic releasing armored TVs to protect against Wii remotes

TVs reinforced for those smashing Wii games - tech - 11 March 2008 - New Scientist Tech

To make its TV sets less vulnerable, Panasonic is planning to use high-strength CRT glass across its range of flat-screen TVs. In a demonstration for New Scientist at a seminar in Valencia, Spain, Panasonic hung a 250-gram steel ball on the end of a cord and let it swing 40 centimetres onto a screen to simulate an impact equivalent to the Wii remote being thrown hard at the screen from across a room.

Even after a wince-inducing 1000 strikes on the same spot, the glass remained intact and unmarked. By contrast, a conventional flat screen cracked after a single strike, exposing its electronic innards to the atmosphere and stopping it working.

The idea will be useful beyond Wii users. "Even if people don't have a Wii, children throw TV remotes at screens," says Michael Price of Panasonic.

Tiny gun

Portal of Evil News | Introducing the world's smallest gun...

March 10, 2008

TSA can't believe MacBook Air is a real computer

TSA can't believe MacBook Air is a real laptop, causes owner to miss flight - Engadget

The TSA has been known to take issue with products designed in Cupertino before, but for one particular traveler, it was Apple's thinnest laptop ever that caused the latest holdup. Upon tossing his ultra-sleek slab of aluminum underneath the scanner, security managed to find enough peculiarities to remove it from the flow, pull it aside and wrangle up the owner for some questions. Apparently, the TSA employee manning the line was flabbergasted by the "lack of a drive" and the complete absence of "ports on the back," and while hordes of co-workers swarmed to investigate, the user's flight took off on schedule. Thankfully, said owner was finally allowed to pass through after some more in-the-know colleagues explained in painfully simple terms what an SSD was, but the poor jet-setter most definitely paid the price for trying to slip some of the latest and greatest under the sharp eyes of the TSA (and cutting it close on time, of course).

Brit camera sees under clothing

But will not reveal why The Pentagon is that shape....

March 06, 2008

The MonaRonaDOna virus scam

The MonaRonaDona Extortion Scam - Security Fix

According to an analysis by Russian anti-virus maker Kaspersky Lab, MonaRonaDona is noisy because its author is hoping the victim will conduct a Google search for instructions on how to remove it. The second result in a Google search for "monaronadona" is a Digg.com article linking to an anonymous blog entry with instructions on downloading and using a product called "Unigray Antivirus." One blog claims Unigray "is considered the best for removing the monaronadona virus compared to the other spyware / antivirus programs." There are a few other prominent results that sing the praises of Unigray Antivirus, including a YouTube.com video.

What these results won't tell you up front is that Unigray Anitvirus costs $39.90. It also fails to mention what Kasperksy analysts figured out on their own: That while Unigray Antivirus will in fact remove the dreaded MonaRonaDona virus, that is the only piece of malware it is designed to remove.

Sky Net begins

Portal of Evil News | Terminator-style robot war 'could...

March 04, 2008

Rudy Rucker debunks the singularity

Rudy’s Blog � Blog Archive � Fundamental Limits to Virtual Reality

Anyway, let’s get back to my main point, which is that VR isn’t ever going to replace RR (real reality). We know that our present-day videogames and digital movies don’t fully match the richness of the real world. What’s not so well known is that computer science provides strong evicence that no feasible VR can ever match nature.

This is because there are no shortcuts for nature’s computations. Due to a property of the natural world that I call the “principle of natural unpredictability,” fully simulating a bunch of particles for a certain period of time requires a system using about the same number of particles for about the same length of time. Naturally occurring systems don’t allow for drastic shortcuts.

Natural unpredictability means that if you build a computer sim world that’s smaller than the physical world, the sim cuts corners and makes compromises, such as using bitmapped wood-grain and cartoon-style repeating backgrounds. Smallish sim worlds are doomed to be dippy Las Vegas/Disneyland/Second Life environments.

(via Futurismic)

March 03, 2008

Smack my satellite up

Wired Blogs | Bruce Sterling | Beyond the Beyond |...

How to: Knit Batgirl Gloves

Bleu Arts: New Knitting Pattern: Batgirl gloves

(via boing boing)