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Game Developers Challenge -- Make a Video Game About The First Time You Had Sex

The Escapist : GDC 2009: Game Designers and Sex

. . . . The core concept for their game, which never really got a title, began when Erin joked, "Why not just make a mini-game where you count ceiling tiles?" The result is a collection of Wario Ware-esque mini-games that take you through first Heather's and then Erin's first times. Levels include scenarios like picking the least complicated outfit (buckles and snaps are bad), choosing non-scary condoms from the grocery store, avoiding a tumble off the top bunk, and finally calling your best friend afterwards. The object is to fill the Humiliation Meter as much as possible without actually failing to have sex. They only had about 36 hours to develop their concept; their presentation was screen shots Erin whipped up with magic markers, but they had a great sense of humor about all of it.

Next up was Sulka Haro, who opted not to focus on his first time, but rather on yours. His game is more about user-generated content and social interaction than reliving his romantic history. A round of "Your First Time" begins with a player picking a photo that represents a moment from their romantic or sexual history. If you kissed your sweetheart on the steps of your high school, you might pull up a picture of a staircase, for example. You then present your picture to the other players, but don't explain it. They then have to create a story that goes with the picture. When the stories have been shared, the player who chose the picture explains the story behind it. Haro admitted that the tricky part of the game is keeping it clean - he suggested using something like Flickr to keep porn out of it.

Last up was last year's winner, Steve Meretzky who started off his presentation in his usual humorous style, describing some of the various game designs he considered, but ultimately rejected, including Hump, Hump Revolution, Where's Dildo?, and Call of Booty. But when he began to explain he game he eventually created, "Wait, Time Passes," his demeanor changed completely. His game is a journey through three stages of his life- high school, college, and adulthood - takes place in Second Life and is driven by conversation and social interaction. The high school level is "miserable" and impossible to win because you're such a geek that no-one will talk to you. College is slightly better, as you begin to gain a modicum of acceptance from others - you have a chance of getting laid. In the last stage, you have the greatest chance of success, because you've finally become comfortable enough with your own geekitude to be happy. When he began his presentation, he said he hoped it was "from the heart," and he certainly succeeded.

March 25, 2009

Compression scheme makes fast games downloadable

No more stops at the video game store - Los Angeles Times
One company, OnLive Inc., showcased one such effort at the Game Developer Conference on Tuesday night. The service promises to let players buy or rent the latest games and start playing within seconds on their television or computers. The Palo Alto company says it will do for fast games, of the type playable only on discs, what others have done for relatively slow-paced titles such as Tetris or solitaire: Store the games on its computer servers so they can be played over a high-speed Web connection. OnLive, whose investors include Warner Bros., says it can do so by rapidly compressing and decompressing the files so the game acts as if it's on a player's computer or console.

March 23, 2009

What we can learn from the creation of the Brooklyn bridge

Rands In Repose: The Makers of Things

Fascinating article, via Waxy.

. . . Both of the towers of the Brooklyn Bridge are in the water of the East River. Ever wonder how you dig a big hole in the bottom of a river bed? In the late 1800s? It’s called a caisson, which is a huge, watertight wooden box half the size of a city block. This monstrosity was constructed on the river, sealed with pine tar, and carefully floated to a specific location on the river. It was then slowly sunk to the riverbed by placing stone on top that would eventually become the foundation.

Done, right?

Wrong. With the caisson on the riverbed, it’s time to push it another 45 feet into the riverbed in search of bedrock. Workers did this through the continued application of stone to the top while workers in the caisson dug out the riverbed with shovels, buckets, and, when necessary, dynamite. There was nothing resembling an electrical grid, so there was nothing resembling modern lighting in this watertight pine-tarred box, which was slowly descending through the floor of the East River. There were no jack hammers, so when they hit rock, they used small amounts of dynamite to crack these rocks. In a pine-tarred box, at the bottom of a river, mostly in a very wet dark.

And when the caisson finally hit bedrock 45 underground, they had to do it all over again for the New York tower. 30 feet deeper.

March 21, 2009

How to: Make a Bay Window Cushion

Bay Window Cushion

March 20, 2009

How To: Make an Eight-Foot Tall Giant Squid Pillow

PW Style -- ThursDIY: 8-foot giant squid pillow

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