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July 17, 2014

Israel bombs four little kids playing on beach

Since when are little kids on a beach a legitimate military target? Through Lens, 4 Boys Dead by Gaza Shore - NYTimes.com
GAZA CITY — My day here began at 6 a.m. Photographing something as unpredictable as war still has a routine. It is important to be out the door at first light to document the destruction of the last night’s bombings. By midmorning, I check in at the hospital’s morgue to see if families have come to pick up the dead for burial. When the routine is broken, it is because things can go horribly wrong in an instant. That is how it happened in Libya in 2011, when three colleagues and I were taken captive by government soldiers and our driver was killed. On Wednesday, that sudden change of fortune came to four young Palestinian boys playing on a beach in Gaza City. I had returned to my small seaside hotel around 4 p.m. to file photos to New York when I heard a loud explosion. My driver and I rushed to the window to see what had happened. A small shack atop a sea wall at the fishing port had been struck by an Israeli bomb or missile and was burning. A young boy emerged from the smoke, running toward the adjacent beach. I grabbed my cameras and was putting on body armor and a helmet when, about 30 seconds after the first blast, there was another. The boy I had seen running was now dead, lying motionless in the sand, along with three other boys who had been playing there. By the time I reached the beach, I was winded from running with my heavy armor. I paused; it was too risky to go onto the exposed sand. Imagine what my silhouette, captured by an Israeli drone, might look like as a grainy image on a laptop somewhere in Israel: wearing body armor and a helmet, carrying cameras that could be mistaken for weapons. If children are being killed, what is there to protect me, or anyone else? . . .

June 09, 2014

Tea Party Terrorists murder cops in Vegas before killing each other

Do we call them Tea Party Terrorists or White Supremacist Terrorists? More and More Ugly
Details are sketchy but Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department sources close to the investigation say the shooters shouted that “this is the start of a revolution” before opening fire on the officers, and draped their bodies with cloth showing a Revolutionary War-era flag. Investigators have also found paraphernalia associated with white supremacists. Sunday night Metro homicide investigators and FBI agents cordoned off and were searching a small apartment complex at 110 S. Bruce St., about four miles from the shooting scene. A resident of the complex said he had spoken with a man who lived in the apartment being searched. He said the man appeared “militant,” and often talked about conspiracy theories. ... Witnesses told police one of the shooters yelled “This is the start of a revolution” before shooting the officers. Gillespie later said he could not confirm that. The shooters then stripped the officers of their weapons and ammunition and badges, according to a law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation. They then covered the officers with something that featured the Gadsden flag, a yellow banner with a coiled snake above the words, “Don’t tread on Me.” The flag is named for Christopher Gadsden a Revolutionary War general who designed it. It has recently come back in vogue as an adopted symbol of the American tea party movement.

April 05, 2014

Christians are slaughtering every Muslim they can find in the Central African Republic

This is utterly horrible. Why isn't anyone talking about it? The story of this church tells so much about the ethnic cleansing going on in the CAR | Public Radio International
The UN's chief special adviser on genocide prevention says that only 20 percent of the country's Muslims are left in the country. The rest have either fled or been killed by members of the Anti-Balaka militia, a Christian extremist militia that formed in 2013 after a Christian president was overthrown by a Muslim. Since then, the violence perpetrated by the Anti-Balaka militia has continued largely unabated. The UN estimates that more than 290,000 people, mostly Muslims, have fled to neighboring countries. The country remains so dangerous that the UN has to airlift food to reach people displaced by the violence — delivery by truck is too dangerous. The BBC's Tim Whewell recently returned from the Central African Republic, where he witnessed the attempts at ethnic cleansing first hand. Whewell traveled for hours from the capital Bangui along dirt tracks in a forest to reach the town of Carnot in the west of the country. It's a place that few journalists or international agencies have reached. Once there, Whewell found a concrete church with a muddy compound full of displaced Muslims. "It's an overwhelming sight when you first see it," says Whewell. "There are about a thousand Muslim fugitives with the few possessions they were able to bring with them, mostly battered foam mattresses." They are there, says Whewell, because of a "remarkably courageous" local priest named Father Justin Nary, who offered refuge to the Muslims. Some traveled for up to two weeks through the bush to reach Carnot once they heard of the priest's offer.