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Global warming causing population explosion of jellyfish

Killer jellyfish population explosion warning - Telegraph

The really bad news is that the [extraordinarily deadly] box jellyfish and another equally poisonous species, Irukandji, are on the move. Scientists are warning that their populations are exploding and will pose a monumental problem unless they are stopped.

The warning comes in a film Invasion of the Jellyfish to be screened by Channel 5 on Tues February 12.

It focuses on the change in behaviour patterns of jellyfish in the Pacific Ocean off Japan and Australia due to depleted food resources as humans fish the world seas.

But a similar incident happened much closer to home in November 27 off the Northern Ireland coast when a 10 mile wide, 13 metre deep swarm of jellyfish swam attacked the country's only salmon farm, wiping out over 1million worth of stock.

February 06, 2008

A region of the Pacific Ocean the size of the continental United States filled with plastic soup

In case you wonder why sperm counts are falling and...

February 05, 2008

Science: Why is the South more violent?

Culture Is Essential by Peter J. Richerson and Robert Boyd, excerpted from Not By Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution

The American South has long been more violent than the North. Colorful descriptions of duels, feuds, bushwhackings, and lynchings feature prominently in visitors’ accounts, newspaper articles, and autobiographies from the eighteenth century onward. Statistics bear out these impressions. For example, over the period 1865–1915, the homicide rate in the South was ten times the current rate for the whole United States, and twice the rate in our most violent cities. Modern homicide statistics tell the same story.

In their book, Culture of Honor, psychologists Richard Nisbett and Dov Cohen argue that the South is more violent than the North because southern people have culturally acquired beliefs about personal honor that are different from their northern counterparts. Southerners, they argue, believe more strongly than Northerners that a person’s reputation is important and worth defending even at great cost. As a consequence, arguments and confrontations that lead to harsh words or minor scuffles in Amherst or Ann Arbor often escalate to lethal violence in Asheville or Austin.

What else could explain these differences? Some feature of the southern environment, such as its greater warmth, could explain why Southerners are more violent. Such hypotheses are plausible, and Nisbett and Cohen are at pains to test them. Northerners and Southerners might differ genetically, but this hypothesis is not very plausible. The settlers of the North and South came mostly from the British Isles and adjacent areas of northwestern Europe. Human populations are quite well mixed on this scale.

Sperm cells created from female embryo

Sperm cells created from female embryo - Telegraph

Sperm cells have been created from a female human embryo in a remarkable breakthrough that suggests it may be possible for lesbian couples to have their own biological children.

British scientists who had already coaxed male bone marrow cells to develop into primitive sperm cells have now repeated the feat with female embryonic stem cells.

The University of Newcastle team that has achieved the feat is now applying for permission to turn the bone marrow of a woman into sperm which, if successful, would make the method more practical than with embryonic cells.

February 02, 2008

Finnish patient gets new jaw from own stem cells

Finnish patient gets new jaw from own stem cells |...

February 01, 2008

Anthill plus concrete equals amazing shit

January 31, 2008

Is Alzheimer's really just type III diabetes?

NRM: Is Alzheimer's really just type III diabetes?

Ever heard of type III diabetes? Tens of thousands of Canadians could be suffering from it, according to a new study. They just know it by a different name: Alzheimer's disease.

Levels of insulin and of its receptors diminish significantly in the brain in early Alzheimer's, and continue to fall as the disease progresses, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. "Insulin disappears early and dramatically in Alzheimer's disease," senior author Dr Suzanne M de la Monte, a neuropathologist and professor of pathology at Brown Medical School, said in a press release. "And many of the unexplained features of Alzheimer's, such as cell death and tangles in the brain, appear to be linked to abnormalities in insulin signalling. This demonstrates that the disease is most likely a neuroendocrine disorder, or another type of diabetes."