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August 12, 2010

Tumors love high fructose corn syrup

Cancer cells slurp up fructose, U.S. study finds - Yahoo! News
WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Pancreatic tumor cells use fructose to divide and proliferate, U.S. researchers said on Monday in a study that challenges the common wisdom that all sugars are the same. Tumor cells fed both glucose and fructose used the two sugars in two different ways, the team at the University of California Los Angeles found. They said their finding, published in the journal Cancer Research, may help explain other studies that have linked fructose intake with pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest cancer types. "These findings show that cancer cells can readily metabolize fructose to increase proliferation," Dr. Anthony Heaney of UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and colleagues wrote.
*Thanks, Mia!*

August 08, 2010

Are methane bubbles responsible for ships lost in the Bermuda Triangle?

How Computer scientists solved the Bermuda Triangle mystery
(CHICAGO) - According to two research scientists the mystery of vanished ships and airplanes in the region dubbed "The Bermuda Triangle" has been solved. Step aside outer space aliens, time anomalies, submerged giant Atlantean pyramids and bizarre meteorological phenomena ... the "Triangle" simply suffers from an acute case of gas. Natural gas—the kind that heats ovens and boils water—specifically methane, is the culprit behind the mysterious disappearances and loss of water and air craft. . . . Because of the correlations and existing data, the two envisioned what would happen when gigantic methane bubbles explode from natural fissures on the seafloor. The methane—normally frozen at great pressure as gas hydrates embedded within subterranean rock—can become dislodged and transform into gaseous bubbles expanding geometrically as they explode upwards. When these bubbles reach the surface of the water they soar into the air, still expanding upwards and outwards. Any ships caught within the methane mega-bubble immediately lose all buoyancy and sink to the bottom of the ocean. If the bubbles are big enough and possess a high enough density they can also knock aircraft out of the sky with little or no warning. Aircraft falling victim to these methane bubbles will lose their engines-perhaps igniting the methane surrounding them-and immediately lose their lift as well, ending their flights by diving into the ocean and swiftly plummeting

August 07, 2010

Spray-on hot flush drug can cause little kids to go into puberty

Warning over spray-on hot flushes drug - health - 07 August 2010 - New Scientist
IF YOU spray on your medicine, be careful who you cuddle. The US Food and Drug Administration has warned that a spray-on treatment for hot flushes may cause premature puberty in young children inadvertently exposed to it. Evamist is an oestrogen spray applied to the inside of the forearm. Its maker, Ther-Rx Corporation, says it is typically absorbed within a minute and advises users to wait 30 minutes before allowing the area to come in contact with other people. Since the drug was approved in the US in 2007, eight cases have been reported of children aged between 3 and 5 developing breast mass, according to the FDA. Both boys and girls have been affected. Symptoms appeared several weeks or even months after related adults starting using the drug.

The sliding scale of the universe

scaleofuniverse.swf from documaga.com - StumbleUpon Interactive fun. Slide the slider left and right to slow scale through the largest and smallest things we know about.

August 04, 2010

Scientists find that the kids these days aren't getting more callous

There was research published last month that suggested the current crop of youngsters were more callous, selfish and inhumane than previous generations, but after other scientists took a close look at the data they discovered that wasn't really the case. Mind - A Snapshot of a Generation May Come Out Blurry - NYTimes.com
In short: Generation Y’s collective personality, if such a thing exists, is not likely to be much different from other generations’. Still, small differences may matter, and there is some agreement in findings from psychologists on both sides of this debate. In his own research, Dr. Terracciano has found a slight decrease in trust over the generations and a slight increase in a something called “ascendancy,” or “competence” — a self-professed confidence in getting things done. This trait is similar to one measured by a widely used questionnaire called the Narcissistic Personality Inventory, which asks people whether they agree with statements like “I will be a success” and “I always know what I’m doing.” This test is not a diagnostic tool for narcissistic personality disorder, a serious psychiatric condition; it is simply a rough gauge of self-confidence, vanity, and self-importance, traits everyone has to some degree. And scores have gone up significantly, at least in some college samples. “This is particularly true in women,” Dr. Twenge. “That is where we see the most dramatic increases.”