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January 05, 2012

Sweden officially recognies Church of Copyism, a religious group devoted to the freedom of information

They claim that file-sharing is a religious rite for them, and so must be protected by law. Fucking awesome. BBC News - Sweden recognises new file-sharing religion Kopimism
A "church" whose central tenet is the right to file-share has been formally recognised by the Swedish government. The Church of Kopimism claims that "kopyacting" - sharing information through copying - is akin to a religious service. The "spiritual leader" of the church said recognition was a "large step". But others were less enthusiastic and said the church would do little to halt the global crackdown on piracy. . . . The church, which holds CTRL+C and CTRL+V (shortcuts for copy and paste) as sacred symbols, does not directly promote illegal file sharing, focusing instead on the open distribution of knowledge to all. It was founded by 19-year-old philosophy student and leader Isak Gerson. He hopes that file-sharing will now be given religious protection. "For the Church of Kopimism, information is holy and copying is a sacrament. Information holds a value, in itself and in what it contains and the value multiplies through copying. Therefore copying is central for the organisation and its members," he said in a statement. . . .

January 02, 2012

Evangelical Christians, Orthodox Jews, and Muslims launch lines of religiously sanctioned sex toys

This comes just after a recent article examining the sex lives of the Puritans, which found that local pastors put a huge emphasis on orgasms between a married couple as a sacred duty to themselves and god. The Puritans may have been puritanical, but they also got their freak on. ‘Holy’ Sex Toys? - The Daily Beast
Joyce’s sex life can be divided into two acts: before and after the Turbo 8 Accelerator. 

 The evangelical Christian from California’s central valley had never had an orgasm alone nor with her husband of 25 years. “I didn’t know I wasn’t having one,” the 59-year-old mother of two told The Daily Beast. Yet after chatting with some church girlfriends, she learned what she was missing. “’All that happens to you?’” she asked. “They looked at me like I was crazy.” Joyce, who requested that we use only her first name, and her equally devout spouse never would have found the bullet-shaped vibrator or the array of “marital aids” they’ve ordered since, if it wasn’t for the Christian sex toy website Book 22—introduced to her by a friend after their chat. “I’m a Christian, but this is awesome,” she said. “It was like being newlyweds again.” . . .

January 01, 2012

This 1996 special about the Mayan apocalypse is incredible

At the 4:00 mark it gets completely great. And it gets even better around 6:30. Seriously. The most amazing Mayan apocalypse special ever

December 27, 2011

Social media in the 16th Century: How Luther went viral

Social media in the 16th Century: How Luther went viral | The Economist
IT IS a familiar-sounding tale: after decades of simmering discontent a new form of media gives opponents of an authoritarian regime a way to express their views, register their solidarity and co-ordinate their actions. The protesters’ message spreads virally through social networks, making it impossible to suppress and highlighting the extent of public support for revolution. The combination of improved publishing technology and social networks is a catalyst for social change where previous efforts had failed. That’s what happened in the Arab spring. It’s also what happened during the Reformation, nearly 500 years ago, when Martin Luther and his allies took the new media of their day—pamphlets, ballads and woodcuts—and circulated them through social networks to promote their message of religious reform. . . .
*Thanks, David!*

December 21, 2011

My Non-Denominational Gift-Giving Holiday Gift To You!

It's been a basically rad year for DIYing and making...