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If you buy a ticket to come see Dan Savage speak you know what you ar egetting into, to then feign outrage is disingenuous at best

He makes a good point regarding cherrypicking the Bible. We ignore a lot of the commands of the bible (shellfish, slavery, marrying your sister-in-law if your brother dies). Why not choose to ignore the anti-gay bits as well? Conservative Groups Accuse Dan Savage Of 'Bullying' After He Highlights Their Hypocrisy | ThinkProgress
SAVAGE: We can learn to ignore the bullshit about gay people in the Bible the same way have learned to ignore the bullshit in the Bible about shellfish about slavery, about dinner about farming, about menstruation, about virginity, about masturbation. We ignore bullshit in the bible about all sorts of things. The Bible is a radically pro-slavery document. Slave owners waived Bibles over their heads during the civil war and justified it…We ignore what the Bible says about slavery because the Bible got slavery wrong. …If the Bible got the easiest moral question that humanity has ever faced wrong, slavery. What are the odds that the Bible got something as complicated as human sexuality wrong? 100 percent.

“Congress Wants Your Church to Spend $50,000”

Pass the offering plate: Congress wants every church to cough up $50,000
The House of Representatives just proposed to cut more than $169 billion from SNAP, formerly the food stamps program. Some representatives argued that feeding hungry people is really the work of the churches. These representatives are essentially saying that every church across America — big, small, and tiny — needs to come up with an extra $50,000 dedicated to feeding people — every year for the next 10 years — to make up for these cuts. The Hartford Institute for Religion and Research estimates there are 335,000 religious congregations in the United States. If the proposals by the House of Representatives to cut SNAP by $133.5 billion and $36 billion are enacted, each congregation will have to spend approximately $50,000 to feed those who would see a reduction or loss of benefits.

Photo Gallery: In Bhutan, people paint cocks on houses to scare off evil spirits

Why? Because 500 years ago the Holy Madman Drukpa Kunley used his member to fight demons. That's why. And he also used his magic cock to sex 5,000 women into enlightenment. In Bhutan, friendly phalluses painted on houses scare off evil spirits (NSFW)

April 27, 2012

"My Son Went to Heaven, and All I Got Was a No. 1 Best Seller"

My Son Went to Heaven, and All I Got Was a No. 1 Best Seller - NYTimes.com
The visions children have in near-death situations often have a great deal to do with what they already believe. Culture to culture, these experiences involve bright light, celestial figures and a sense of watching your own body from above and sometimes all three. According to Kevin Nelson, a neuroscientist and the author of “The Spiritual Doorway in the Brain,” adults often have a sense of looking back over a life; young children, lacking that perspective, tend to report “castles and rainbows, often populated with pets, wizards, guardian angels, and like adults, they see relatives and religious figures, too.” It’s hard to convey to anyone who grew up without the idea of God just how fully the language, stories and “logic” of the Bible can dominate a young mind, even — perhaps especially — the mind of a toddler. To some degree, I speak from experience. When I was not quite 4 — about the same age as Colton Burpo — my own newly born-again parents sat me down to impart the good news about Jesus, the son of God, who was born in a manger surrounded by sheep and donkeys and ended up being nailed to a cross on a hill and dying there. On the third day, he rose from the grave (you could tell it was he from the nail holes), and he did all of this to pay for my sins. If I accepted him into my heart, I would be rewarded with everlasting life in heaven. Otherwise, I would burn eternally with the Devil in hell. So we needed, urgently, to pray. “Right now?” I said, or something like that. I remember not feeling 100 percent ready to ask this undead man, with his holey extremities, to dwell inside me. “Well, yes,” I recall my mother saying. “Unless you’d like to spend eternity in the lake of fire, crying out for a drink of water.” My father laid his hand on my shoulder. “We don’t want that, do we?” “Daddy and I would hear you from our mansion up in heaven,” my mother said. “But we wouldn’t be able to help.” . . .