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May 28, 2013

Pope Francis says atheists can go to heaven, but Vatican overrules him

I didn't even know the Vatican *could* overrule the Pope. Vatican: Whatever Pope Francis meant, atheists still burn in hell
Rome - After Pope Francis told the world that even atheists are redeemed, Vatican spokesman Thomas Rosica has issued a statement that the pope's words do not mean atheists are saved. They are still going to hell if they do not "enter" the Catholic Church. Pope Francis's comments received worldwide attention, with many hopefully interpreting his words to mean that atheists could go to heaven if they do not become Catholics but "do good." CNN reports that many American atheists welcomed the pope's comments, saying it signaled a new spirit of rapprochement between the Church and secular society. According to CNN, David Silverman, president of American Atheists, welcomed the pope's statement, saying: "While the concept of Jesus dying for atheists is wrong on many levels (especially given that Jesus himself promised hell for blasphemers), I can appreciate the pope's 'good faith' effort to include atheists in the moral discussion. Atheists on the whole want no part in Catholicism, of course, but we are all interested in basic human rights.” . . .

May 01, 2013

isconsin Church Cancels Former NFL Player's Speech For Supporting Jason Collins

The #1 reason young people give for leaving their church is institutional homophobia. You can't preach that Jesus wants us to love our neighbors and then turn around and demonize gay people. It just don't fly anymore. Wisconsin Church Cancels Former NFL Player's Speech For Supporting Jason Collins | ThinkProgress
LeRoy Butler, former safety for the Green Bay Packers, was scheduled to give an anti-bullying presentation at a Wisconsin church this summer, but now the speech is off because he supported Jason Collins for coming out this week. Butler shared the following in a series of tweets today: Wow, I was schedule to speak at a church in WI, and a member said that the pastor wants to cancel my event, I said ok why? Then I was told, because I said congrats to Jason Collins on twitter, I said really? we have a contract, he said check the moral cause. FYI the fee was 8500$,then I was told if i removed the tweet, and apologize and ask god forgiveness, I can have the event, I said no.

April 16, 2013

Orphan Fever: The Evangelical Movement's Adoption Obsession

Adopting kids from Africa and raising them without education, as slaves in all but name. Like Jesus said to. Orphan Fever: The Evangelical Movement's Adoption Obsession | Mother Jones
All was not harmonious in Primm Springs either, according to the four Allison adoptees I interviewed at length for this story. (Sam Allison has denied all of their allegations.) "Everything was good for a month," CeCe, now 21, told me. "We got to the next month and things started to get a little weird." Serene's raw-food offerings were unfamiliar, but Sam would discipline them if they balked at eating her meals, the children said. Other cultural impasses included the children's use of Liberian English and the Liberian prohibition on children looking adults in the eye. "They'd say, 'You are so rude. I'm talking to you!'" CeCe recalled. "They expected us to adapt in a heartbeat." In October 2006, a year after their first Liberian adoptions, the Allisons adopted another pair of siblings: Kula, 13, and Alfred, 15. "In Africa we thought America was heaven," recalled Kula, who is 19 now. "I thought there were money trees." Primm Springs was a rude awakening: It was dirty, she recalled, and she had no toothbrush. The new house Sam was building—with the older kids working alongside him—often lacked electricity. There was only a woodstove for heat, and no air conditioning or running water yet. Toilets were flushed with buckets of water hauled from a creek behind the house. The children recalled being so hungry that they would, on occasion, cook a wild goose or turkey they caught on the land. "We went from Africa to Africa," CeCe said. They didn't attend school, either; home schooling mostly consisted of Serene reading to the younger children. When the older kids watched a school bus drive past on a country road and asked why they couldn't go, they were met with various excuses. So Isaiah and Alfred worked with Sam in his house-painting business or labored in Nancy Campbell's immense vegetable garden while CeCe, Kula, and Cherish cleaned, cooked, and tended to a growing brood of young ones. It was also the job of the "African kids," as they called themselves, to keep a reservoir filled with water from the creek. CeCe hadn't yet learned to read when Serene gave her a book on midwifery so she could learn to deliver their future babies. "They treated us pretty much like slaves," she said. It's a provocative accusation, but one that Kula and Isaiah—as well as two neighbors and a children's welfare worker—all repeated.