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On the truth of Dave Eggers' nonfiction book "Zeitoun"

Eggers portrays Zeitoun as a saint and a hero in his book, apparently not caring about Zeitoun's continuing brutal abuse of his wife enough to complicate his narrative. Much like how Eggers decided not to complicate his memoir "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius" by mentioning how much support he received from his sister who was all but removed from history. Does Eggers have a problem with women? Or just with hacking his nonfiction books into shape without gross misunderstandings? Los Angeles Review of Books - Refusal To Cooperate: The Afterlife Of "Zeitoun"
Eggers is far more adored as a person than Mailer, and, by all accounts, he’s a great guy, co-founding nonprofit tutorial centers, establishing charitable foundations, and raising awareness of social injustice through his nonprofit Voice of Witness series, among other selfless endeavors. With his widely praised and award-winning nonfictional Zeitoun, Eggers hoped to shed light on “one of the worst natural disasters in American history and the problematic tendrils of the war on terror.” Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a Syrian-American, spent 23 days in jail, wrongly accused of terrorist activity, after his post-Katrina heroics. Eggers’s Zeitoun is a loving family man — peaceful, calm, and devoted to his wife. Jonathan Demme’s animated film based on Eggers’s book might have to be put on hold, considering Zeitoun’s post-publication spate of domestic battery charges, which includes punching his now ex-wife in the back of her head and striking her with a tire iron; and even more so now that Zeitoun has been in jail since July 25. On November 8th, a state grand jury in Orleans Parish indicted Zeitoun for allegedly trying to kill Ms. Zeitoun and then ordering a hit on her from behind bars. The indictment replaces several other charges against Zeitoun, in an effort to speed the way to a trial, averting a preliminary hearing. Zeitoun remains in jail, with bail set at more than one million dollars. “If he’s released from jail,” Assistant District Attorney Lauren Faveret asked Ms. Zeitoun in court, “would you be fearful for your life?” “I’d be dead,” Ms. Zeitoun replied. The first degree charges stem from additional factors: Ms. Zeitoun had a restraining order in place before the beating, and that Abdulrahman Zeitoun allegedly ordered other hits — on Ms. Zeitoun’s son and another man — from jail.

Women authors still using male pseudonyms, because men don't read books written by women

Years ago in conversation with a writer friend I realized I hadn't read a book written by a woman in at least a year. It wasn't intentional. I wasn't avoiding women authors. It just worked out that way as I followed my natural inclinations. And this was when I worked in a bookstore. I felt ashamed afterwards for the unconscious prejudice I'd fallen into it and set out to right it. And I'm glad I did. During that next year I read a bunch of Le Guin, I read Candas Jane Dorsey's magnificent Black Wine, I read Joanna Russ and James Tiptree, jr. When I hit a dead end I looked up the Tiptree award winners and picked my way through those, discovering the wonderful L. Timmel Duchamp and Lisa Tuttle. I was one of those guys who only read books by men and would have kept on doing so, I'm sure, if someone hadn't pointed out how much I was missing. Why Women Writers Still Take Men's Names - WSJ.com
In 'City of Dark Magic," a new fantasy novel about a Beethoven scholar and a murder mystery in Prague, no one is quite who they seem to be. Neither, it turns out, is the author, Magnus Flyte, a supposed international man of mystery, who is actually a pseudonym for the book's authors, Christina Lynch and Meg Howrey. Ms. Lynch and Ms. Howrey decided to use a male pseudonym for their first thriller partly because they read studies saying that while women would buy books by either sex, men preferred books by men, says Ms. Lynch. They didn't want to risk losing a single reader. "Why would we want to exclude anyone?" says Ms. Lynch. The Bronte sisters published their 19th-century masterpieces as the Bell brothers, because, Charlotte Bronte wrote, "we had a vague impression that authoresses are liable to be looked on with prejudice." More than 150 years later, women are still facing the same "prejudice" in some sectors of the publishing industry.