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The sequel no one wanted, coming to a bookstore near you

Sequel to Catcher in the Rye penned | theBookseller.com

A former gravedigger and debut novelist has penned a sequel to J D Salinger’s seminal work The Catcher in the Rye which is due to be released next month.

. . .

Windupbird (the publisher) describes him as a "bewildered old man who is suddenly and maliciously yanked back onto the page by his creator". Caulfield comes to his senses and has an overwhelming compulsion to flee. He boards a bus and embarks on a curious journey through the streets of New York and "many poignant memories of his adulthood".

Windupbird added: "Threaded through this is the conscience of his creator, who, while attempting to understand his American anti-hero, fiercely battles to keep up with him and control the directions he takes."

Recommended Reading: Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned by Wells Tower

Finished reading Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned: Stories, by Wells...

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May 13, 2009

Harper Collins paid Sarah Palin $7,000,000 for a book deal

Bookninja -- And in comforting news…

The next time someone wonders why Harper Collins is piss broke, think of this.

Take the news out of Alaska (!) that Sarah Palin (oh, how I long for the day when we can once again ask, as a culture, “Who?”) has signed a deal with Harper Collins to publish an “unfiltered memoir” in the spring of 2010.

A deal worth — brace yourselves — $7,000,000. Yup. Seven Million Bucks.

It’s not for me to judge. Or question. I mean, Harper Collins is hurting financially, so I’m sure they think this is a good idea. And I’m sure that someone out there is interested in reading this book (personally, I’d like to find that person and kick them in the shin — but I think that’s just the lack of coffee talking, it’s barely 6 am out here in the hinterlands) and, you know, to each their own. I mean, $7M, that’s a pretty reasonable bet on someone whose fifteen minutes ran out the first Wednesday of last November…

May 09, 2009

Recommended Reading: "The Ray-Gun: A Love Story"

Nebula/Hugo Nominee This is a story about a ray-gun. The...

The LA Times profiles Ursula K LeGuin

Ursula K. Le Guin's work still resonates with readers - Los Angeles Times

"I think Le Guin is vastly underrated by the critical establishment, which continues to stereotype her as a genre writer," says former NEA Chairman Dana Gioia. "She's become a deeply serious writer without losing the vitality and the excitement of popular literature."

Her admirers include Salman Rushdie as well as the generation working genre's borderlands: Michael Chabon, Neil Gaiman, David Mitchell, Jonathan Lethem and Kelly Link.

For all this, she is in a curious position: She's achieved these things almost entirely on the basis of work now three and four decades old. "She was the big thing for almost 20 years," said Donna White, author of "Dancing With Dragons: Ursula Le Guin and the Critics." "The 1970s and 1980s were her big decades; she was revered by scholars. But now people have moved on."

Her status is further confused because of the variety of fields -- YA, fantasy, science fiction, essays -- in which she writes.

They even get quotes from my old professor at the University of Michigan, Eric Rabkin.

May 08, 2009

Inside the James Patterson novel-writing sweatshop

Peter de Jonge, a James Patterson Collaborator, Goes It Alone - NYTimes.com

Mr. Patterson now publishes so many best sellers, in so many different genres, that he can’t possibly write them all. So he farms many of his books out to a factory, or an atelier, if you like: a team of co-authors who work from Patterson-supplied outlines and stick closely to the no-frills Patterson formula: short chapters, short paragraphs, short sentences, short words.

Before branching out on his own, Mr. de Jonge (pronounced da JONG) spent several years on that assembly line, as co-writer of the Patterson novels “Miracle on the 17th Green,” “The Beach House” and “Beach Road.” He was the pioneer, so to speak — the person who first gave Mr. Patterson the idea that he could write more than one book at a time — though the two men have differing recollections about how the collaboration started.

. . .

For all three books Mr. Patterson supplied lengthy outlines. The instructions he gives his co-authors are very detailed, he explained, and then he extensively reworks their drafts. “The outlines I do are really, really powerful,” he said. “They’re 60 pages sometimes, and they’re pretty good to read just on their own. They’re like little high-adrenaline bullet trains, with every chapter built around a nugget.”