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Tolstoy's wife's diaries show what a bastard Tolstoy was

Sofia Tolstoy's diaries paint bleak portrait of marriage to Leo | Books | guardian.co.uk

What emerges from Sofia's diaries, which span more than 50 years and which are due to be published by Alma Books this October, is a picture of a cruel and difficult man, indifferent to his family, endlessly critical, who forced his wife to breastfeed all 13 of their children despite the agony it caused her.

"All the things that he preaches for the happiness of humanity only complicate life to the point where it becomes harder and harder for me to live," wrote Sofia – who transcribed all of Tolstoy's manuscripts, including War and Peace, in longhand – at the start of 1895. "His vegetarian diet means the complication of preparing two dinners, which means twice the expense and twice the work. His sermons on love and goodness have made him indifferent to his family, and mean the intrusion of all kinds of riff-raff into our family life. And his (purely verbal) renunciation of worldly goods has made him endlessly critical and disapproving of others."

Later, in October 1899, she gives a snapshot of life at Yasnaya Polyana, when Tolstoy suffering from a bad cough and cold went out for a walk without telling Sofia where he was going. "A storm blew up, it rained and snowed, roofs and trees were smashed, the window-frames rattled, it grew dark – there was no moon yet – and still he didn't appear. I went out to the porch and stood on the terrace, waiting for him with a spasm in my throat and a sinking heart, as I used to when I was young and he went out hunting and I would wait hour after hour in an agony of suspense," she writes. Eventually he returns, and she starts to cry and rebuke him. "And to all my passionate and loving words his ironic reply was: 'So what if I went out? I'm not a little boy, I don't have to tell you.' ... I felt angry with him. I devote so much love and care to him, and his heart is so icy." . . .

June 02, 2009

Ten Genre Fiction Editors Talk Shop About What They Want From Submissions

Clarkesworld Magazine : The Story Is All: Ten Fiction Editors Talk Shop by Jeremy L. C. Jones

First and foremost, magazine fiction editors are readers who love stories so much that they've made a career out of reading them. They have a not-so-simple job: select, prepare, and present the best stories they can to a specific audience.

Below, ten of the top speculative fiction magazine editors talk about what they do and how they do it. Each of the editors works for a different speculative fiction magazine—print or online (or both), new or long-running (or revived after a hiatus). They seek fantasy, science fiction, or horror stories… or some innovative combination thereof.

Ultimately, fiction editors are the people who mine the slush pile for new voices and who push established writers to grow beyond their previous stories. They read story after story, and more pile up each day. They screen, sort, revise, and reject. They seek the new, the fresh, the familiar, the entertaining, and the weird. They discover and they miss out.

Salinger sues over unauthorized sequel to Catcher

JD Salinger starts legal action against sequel author - Telegraph

Lawyers for Salinger, 90, have filed a lawsuit in federal court in Manhattan, seeking to force a recall of what it says is a copycat book titled 60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye, by someone writing under the name JD California. It also seeks unspecified damages.

The lawsuit said the right to create a sequel to The Catcher in the Rye or to use the character "Holden Caulfield" belongs only to Salinger. The lawsuit says Salinger has "decidedly chosen not to exercise that right."

. . .

In 60 Years Later, scheduled to be published in Britain this summer and in the United States in the autumn, a character very much like Caulfield is 76 years old, an escapee from a retirement home and identified as "Mr. C." The novel is dedicated to Salinger and the author is a character in it, too, wondering whether to continue Caulfield's story.

"The Sequel is not a parody and it does not comment upon or criticise the original," Salinger's lawsuit claims. "It is a ripoff pure and simple."