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October 02, 2012

On the scourge of cheating in Texas fishing competitions

Texas Cases a Sign of Wider Fraud in Fishing Tournaments - NYTimes.com
One game warden who watched the Nice Tails team transfer its fish from the boat to a blue cooler at a nearby ramp had a problem with two large spotted sea trout. The red discoloration on their tails, bellies and rear fins indicated that they were not caught during the weekend tournament, but caught days earlier and kept alive in a wire basket or some other device. On the South Texas Gulf Coast, such a move would be the equivalent of sneaking into a big-city marathon at the final mile to cross the finish line first. The investigation moved, like the patient sport itself, unswiftly. Tips came in, including one stating that the father of the Nice Tails captain and another man were seen receiving an illicit flounder. Witnesses were interviewed, and at least one informer — the man who supplied the flounder — came forward. After a weeklong investigation by game wardens and the filing of a probable-cause affidavit, the arrests began: The four female team members, along with the boat’s captain and two other men, were haled before a Cameron County justice of the peace, arraigned and released after posting bond. They were charged with a third-degree felony — fraud in a fishing tournament — for their actions at the Ladies Kingfish Tournament in August. Texas is the only state with a tournament fishing fraud law, but perhaps the most extraordinary thing about the crime was how ordinary such fraud has become across the country. With numerous fishing tournaments offering $100,000 to $500,000 in cash and prizes, allegations of cheating have become routine in Texas, Louisiana, Florida and other states. Contestants — both professionals and amateurs — might catch fish long before tournaments begin or inject them with water or stuff them with heavy objects to boost their weight. Keeping fish longer than 16 inches is illegal in Texas, and some fishermen have been caught clipping tails to an allowable length. Those who run, monitor and compete in tournaments said that cheating scandals have tarnished the wholesome image of fishing and ruined the final rankings in many competitions, as people handed trophies, cash and other prizes were later found to have cheated.

September 28, 2012

This doll was the inspiration for Chucky from Child's Play

Robert the Doll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Robert, otherwise known as Robert the Doll,[1] Robert the Haunted Doll,[2][3][4] or Robert the Enchanted Doll;[5] is a doll that was once owned by Key West painter and author Robert Eugene Otto. The doll is alleged to be possessed by evil spirits and has a terrifying reputation. The doll, which is allegedly cursed, has become a fixture of ghost tours in the Key West area since it was inducted into the Fort East Martello Museum. Aesthetically, Robert resembles an early 20th century American Naval officer. Contrary to popular belief, however, the doll's hair is not made of human hair, but rather, it consists of a synthetic material resembling wool yarn.[6] Eugene was given the doll in 1906 by an Bahamian servant who, according to legend, was skilled in black magic and voodoo and was displeased with the family. Soon afterward, it became clear that there was something eerie about the doll. Eugene's parents said they often heard him talking to the doll and that the doll appeared to be talking back. Although at first they assumed that Eugene was simply answering himself in a changed voice, they later believed that the doll was actually speaking. Neighbors claimed to see the doll moving from window to window when the family was out. The Otto family swore that sometimes the doll would emit a terrifying giggle and that they caught glimpses of it running from room to room. In the night Eugene would scream, and when his parents ran to the room, they would find furniture knocked over and Eugene in bed, looking incredibly scared, telling them that "Robert did it!". In addition, guests swore that they saw Robert's expression change before their eyes. When Eugene died in 1974, the doll was left in the attic until the house was bought again. The new family included a ten-year old girl, who became Robert's new owner. It was not long before the girl began screaming out in the night, claiming that Robert moved about the room and even attempted to attack her on multiple occasions. More than thirty years later, she still tells interviewers that the doll was alive and wanted to kill her.[7] . . .
(via Abhay's tumblr)