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February 04, 2014

This AT-AT sled is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen

It probably tipped over immediately and exploded as a smaller sled piloted by Wedge Antilles raced by, but for one glorious moment this AT-AT ruled the snow. Massive Star Wars AT-AT Walker Sled Races in the 8th Annual Cardboard Classic
photo by Robert Killips / Lansing State Journal Doug Brewbaker, Garret Geiger, and James Groves spent 70 hours building a fantastic seven-foot, eight-inch tall AT-AT Walker sled out of cardboard, paper, glue, tape, and paint. They raced their massive four-legged sled against 50 other competitors at the 8th Annual Cardboard Classic in Lansing, Michigan on January 25th, 2014.

January 30, 2014

Bed Bugs, Statistics, Press-Release Reporting, and You

(Reposted from my Snip, Burn, Solder Blog) I continue to...

January 14, 2014

Fore-edge painting blows my mind

When held in just the right way, an ordinary book's edge reveals a hidden painting. Just gorgeous. I’ll Never Ever Look At Books The Same Again After Seeing These Hidden Messages. Wow. - The Meta Picture

November 27, 2013

Today's Tumblr: Texts From The Danger Zone

Screenshots of ARCHER with "texts from last night" added. Texts From the Danger Zone

November 06, 2013

Today's Tumblr: Pornhub comments on stock photos

Real, stupid comments from Pornhub pasted over generic dude stock photos. This is my favorite thing for the next five minutes. Pornhub Comments on stock photos (via Abhay)

October 28, 2013

"How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the RoboRoach"

(FYI: this is a cross-post from my Snip, Burn, Solder...

October 04, 2013

The problem with travel is all the other travelers

Actual complaints received by THOMAS COOK vacations. (Note to self: never book a trip through Thomas Cook, the other customers are intolerable.) It’s enough to make you cancel your reservation | bl0gdramedy
4. “We booked an excursion to a water park but no-one told us we had to bring our own swimsuits and towels. We assumed it would be included in the price” 5. “The beach was too sandy. We had to clean everything when we returned to our room.” 6. “We found the sand was not like the sand in the brochure. Your brochure shows the sand as white but it was more yellow.” 7. “They should not allow topless sunbathing on the beach. It was very distracting for my husband who just wanted to relax.” 8. “No-one told us there would be fish in the water. The children were scared.” 9. “Although the brochure said that there was a fully equipped kitchen, there was no egg-slicer in the drawers.” 10. “We went on holiday to Spain and had a problem with the taxi drivers as they were all Spanish.”

September 23, 2013

Coining new words is endemic to the American heart

The American Scholar: Is There a Word for That? - Ralph Keyes
Soon after they arrived in America, British settlers got busy with an important task: reinventing their language. This called for repurposing old words and coining new ones. Colonists called the plump, smelly rodents they encountered in swamps muske rats. Other forms of wildlife were named katydids, bobcats, catfish, and whippoorwills. To these settlers, sleigh improved on sledge, and the help reflected their values better than servants. “The new circumstances under which we are placed,” observed Thomas Jefferson, “call for new words, new phrases, and for the transfer of old words to new objects.” “Necessity,” he concluded, “obliges us to neologize.” According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Jefferson is the first person known to have used the term neologize, in an 1813 letter. It is one of 110 words whose earliest use the OED credits to him. Others include indescribable, pedicure, and electioneer. Once they caught wind of all the new words being coined across the Atlantic, self-appointed guardians of the King’s English were rather cross. When Jefferson used the new word belittle in his 1781 book Notes on the State of Virginia, a British critic exclaimed, “It may be an elegant [word] in Virginia, and even perfectly intelligible; but for our part, all we can do is to guess at its meaning. For shame, Mr. Jefferson!” Undaunted, the third president proceeded to coin Anglophobia. Contempt for the New World’s neologisms continued unabated in the old one. Historically, the British have looked upon American word inventions with all the enthusiasm of an art museum curator examining Elvis-on-velvet paintings. In a famous exchange with American lexicographer Noah Webster, an English naval officer named Basil Hall expressed dismay about the many new words he heard while visiting America in the late 1820s. Webster defended the verbal creativity of his countrymen. If a new word proved useful, he asked, why not add it to the vocabulary? “Because there are words enough already,” responded Hall. . . .