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This Day in Labor History: May 4, 1886 -- The Haymarket Square Riot

The men convicted and hanged for the Haymarket bombing were likely innocent. The police had no evidence and six of the men were nowhere near the riot. No one knows who threw the bomb. The police didn't care. They just rounded up the local heads of the labor movement and railroaded them all the way to the gallows. This Day in Labor History: May 4, 1886 - Lawyers, Guns & Money : Lawyers, Guns & Money
On March 4, 1886, during a protest march against police brutality in Chicago’s Haymarket Square, a bomb went off in the middle of a group of policemen, killing 7 officers. The aftermath of the Haymarket bombing showed the fear American capitalists had of working-class ideologies, the lack of civil liberties during the Gilded Age, and the tenuousness of labor organizations during these years of class formation. The mid-1880s saw the native-born working class struggling to understand the new labor system of the Gilded Age. With the promises of mutually respectful employer-employee relations at the center of early Republican free labor ideology shown to be a farce and workers living increasing desperate lives in dirty and dangerous factories and condemned to poverty, the American working-class sought to even the playing field between employer and employee. The Knights of Labor promised the eight-hour day; in a period when labor looked for a single panacea to solve all problems rather than a deep class analysis of labor-employer relations, the working-class jumped to the idea. The Knights, led by Terence Powderly, grew rapidly in the mid-1880s, even though Powderly didn’t really envision the organization as a radical challenge to capitalism. Still, “Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Sleep, Eight Hours for What You Will” became the slogan for a million or more Americans. But Powderly’s control over the organization was tenuous and with the Knights defined as open to all workers, it meant that anarchists and other radicals could easily join and then try to convert workers to their cause. The center of 8-hour organizing was in Chicago, where small numbers of radicals began organizing workers to demand the 8-hour day and threaten a general strike if denied. On May 1, 1886, between 300,000 and 500,000 workers walked off their job around the nation. Probably 80,000 of those workers were in Chicago. The police responded with sadly predictable violence. On May 3, police murdered 6 strikers at the McCormick Harvesting Machine plant. The McCormick workers had been battling with their employer for a year, who had hired Pinkertons to beat them. They combined their already existing struggle with the 8-hour day to become some of the most respected working-class militants in the city. Responding to the murders, labor called a march to protest police violence the next day at Haymarket Square, which somewhere between 1000-3000 people attended. . . .

May 03, 2012

Be careful using an iPad on your back, you could knock your teeth out

Just like this girl in Taiwan who fell asleep while using an iPad. Little Girl Played with an iPad. She Got Her Teeth Knocked Out.

May 01, 2012

FBI talks another group of young men into becoming failed terrorists

‘May Day’ Bridge Bombing Suspect Worried Group Would Be Sent To Gitmo | TPMMuckraker
The group of five alleged anarchists who authorities say plotted to blow up a bridge outside of Cleveland in commemoration of the Occupy “May Day” protests switched their plans several times and were suspicious that the undercover agent who sold them fake explosives was, in fact, a cop. The FBI arrested 26-year-old Douglas L. Wright, 20-year-old Brandon L. Baxter, 35-year-old Anthony Hayne, 20-year-old Connor C. Stevens and 23-year-old Joshua S. Stafford this week for allegedly plotting to use C-4 explosives on the Brecksville-Northfield High Level Bridge in Ohio. The FBI affidavit in support of the arrests makes multiple references to “one percenters” “corporations” and the “May 1st” protests associated with the Occupy movement. The confidential source who brought the suspects to the FBI’s attention had been working with federal agents since July 2011. The source has a conviction for possession of cocaine in 1990 and a robbery conviction in 1991 as well as four convictions for passing bad checks between 1991 and 2011. The source was paid about $5,750 for his services. The confidential source attended an Oct. 21 protest and “identified four suspicious males with walkie-talkie radios around their necks,” three of four of whom had masks covering their faces. While the exact protest isn’t specified, Occupy Cleveland held a protest that same weekend.

April 27, 2012

"Like a man who eats sesame oil, his anus farts": The Rock-Solid Aphorisms of Ancient Sumeria

The Gecko Wears a Tiara: Ancient Sumerian Proverbs A note...