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October 01, 2012

Some grandchildren of holocaust survivors are tattooing their arms with camp numbers

With Tattoos, Young Israelis Bear Holocaust Scars of Relatives - NYTimes.com
JERUSALEM — When Eli Sagir showed her grandfather, Yosef Diamant, the new tattoo on her left forearm, he bent his head to kiss it. Mr. Diamant had the same tattoo, the number 157622, permanently inked on his own arm by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Nearly 70 years later, Ms. Sagir got hers at a hip tattoo parlor downtown after a high school trip to Poland. The next week, her mother and brother also had the six digits inscribed onto their forearms. This month, her uncle followed suit. “All my generation knows nothing about the Holocaust,” said Ms. Sagir, 21, who has had the tattoo for four years. “You talk with people and they think it’s like the Exodus from Egypt, ancient history. I decided to do it to remind my generation: I want to tell them my grandfather’s story and the Holocaust story.” . . .

THIS WEEK'S RESEARCH HOLE: Whale Meat (Which Should Probably Be Considered Kosher)

I'm not gonna explain how this happened, but I fell...

Continue reading "THIS WEEK'S RESEARCH HOLE: Whale Meat (Which Should Probably Be Considered Kosher)" »

September 29, 2012

These really are quite endearing: Jerry Seinfeld's "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee"

Basically just Jerry Seinfeld cold chilling with famous-ass funny folk....

September 27, 2012

Was Nat Turner Right?

I love it when people cut through the myth and the propaganda and the bullshit and pull out actually primary sources to make their case. Ta-Nehisi Coates is especially good at this. Here he is looking at the effect of Nat Turner's rebellion on the political climate of Virginia in the 1830s. And at the very weird definition of "emancipation" the politicians of Virginia were considering passing, which was less like freedom and more like exile. Was Nat Turner Right? - Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Atlantic
Continuing the thread on Nat Turner from yesterday, it's long been held that Nat Turner's revolt, essentially scuttled any chance of manumission in the South. The early 1830s in Virginia were the last time when emancipation was taken up for debate before the Civil War. For those who believe that the Civil War was tragic, the Virginia debates stand out as a good point to plant a counterfactual. But should be clear about what Virginia meant by "emancipation." Here's Virginia governor John Floyd in 1831: I shall in my annual message recommend that laws be passed to confine the slaves to the estates of their masters, prohibit negroes from preaching, absolutely to drive from this state all free negroes, and to substitute the surplus revenue in our treasury annually for slaves, to work for a time upon our railroads etc. and then sent out of the country, preparatory, or rather as the first step to emancipation. So what we have is a curious emancipation--repression, apprenticeship, and then exile. Eric Foner actually concludes that far from stifling talk of emancipation, Turner's revolt fueled this spirit of repression and abolition: It has been an enduring myth in historical literature that in 1831 Virginia was on the verge of abolishing slavery and that Turner's revolt prevented such action. As recently as 1970 Frank Vandiver wrote in his history of the Confederacy that Turner "killed the debate for manumission." Yet the very opposite is true: far from killing the debate, Nat Turner opened it. In the closing months of 1831, petitions poured into the Virginia legislature from throughout the state. Some called for the removal of all free blacks from the state blaming them for fomenting unrest among the slave; some demanded new restrictions on the black population; but many, arguing mainly from the fear and insecurity the Turner revolt had created and point to the continuing increase of the black population, called for the gradual emancipation of the slaves and their colonization outside the country. This gets us right back to the question of the Civil War. Would such repression, paired with indentured servitude, and then the effective exile of Virginia's black population have been preferable to the Civil War? The question itself is rather bizarre. I suspect that there are actual reasons why emancipation never came to the state, though it seemed ripe for it. At the time of Turner's rebellion the locus of slaveholding was moving West.