1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110  |  111  |  112  |  113  |  114  |  115  |  116  |  117  |  118  |  119  |  120  |  121  |  122  |  123  |  124  |  125  |  126  |  127  |  128  |  129  |  130  |  131  |  132  |  133  |  134  |  135  |  136  |  137  |  138  |  139  |  140  |  141  |  142  |  143  |  144  |  145  |  146  |  147  |  148  |  149  |  150  |  151  |  152  |  153  |  154  |  155  |  156  |  157  |  158  |  159  |  160  |  161  |  162  |  163  |  164  |  165  |  166  |  167  |  168  |  169  |  170  |  171  |  172  |  173  |  174  |  175  |  176  |  177  |  178  |  179  |  180  |  181  |  182  |  183  |  184  |  185  |  186  |  187  |  188  |  189  |  190  |  191  |  192  |  193  |  194  |  195  |  196  |  197  |  198  |  199  |  200  |  201  |  202  |  203  |  204  |  205  |  206  |  207  |  208  |  209  |  210  |  211  |  212  |  213  |  214  |  215  |  216  |  217  |  218  |  219  |  220  |  221  |  222  |  223  |  224  |  225  |  226  |  227  |  228  |  229  |  230  |  231  |  232  |  233  |  234  |  235  |  236  |  237  |  238  |  239  |  240  |  241  |  242  |  243  |  244  |  245  |  246  |  247  |  248  |  249  |  250  |  251  |  252  |  253  |  254  |  255  |  256  |  257  |  258  |  259  |  260  |  261  |  262  |  263  |  264  |  265  |  266  |  267  |  268  |  269  |  270  |  271  |  272  |  273  |  274  |  275  |  276  |  277  |  278  |  279  |  280  |  281  |  282  |  283  |  284  |  285  |  286  |  287  |  288  |  289  |  290  |  291  |  292  |  293  |  294  |  295  |  296  |  297  |  298  |  299  |  300  |  301  |  302  |  303  |  304  |  305  |  306  |  307  |  308  |  309  |  310  |  311  |  312  |  313  |  314  |  315  |  316  |  317  |  318  |  319  |  320  |  321  |  322  |  323  |  324  |  325  |  326  |  327  |  328  |  329  |  330  |  331  |  332  |  333  |  334  |  335  |  336  |  337  |  338  |  339  |  340  |  341  |  342  |  343  |  344  |  345  |  346  |  347  |  348  |  349  |  350  |  351  |  352  |  353  |  354  |  355  |  356  |  357  |  358  |  359  |  360  |  361  |  362  |  363  |  364  |  365  |  366  |  367  |  368  |  369  |  370  |  371  |  372  |  373  |  374  |  375  |  376  |  377  |  378  |  379  |  380  |  381  |  382  |  383  |  384  |  385  |  386  |  387  |  388  |  389  |  390  |  391  |  392  |  393  |  394  |  395  |  396  |  397  |  398  |  399  |  400  |  401  |  402  |  403  |  404  |  405  |  406  |  407  |  408  |  409  |  410  |  411  |  412  |  413  |  414  |  415  |  416  |  417  |  418  |  419  |  420  |  421  |  422  |  423  |  424  |  425  |  426  |  427  |  428  |  429  |  430  |  431  |  432  |  433  |  434  |  435  |  436  |  437  |  438  |  439  |  440  |  441  |  442  |  443  |  444  |  445  |  446  |  447  |  448  |  449  |  450  |  451  |  452  |  453  |  454  |  455  |  456  |  457  |  458  |  459  |  460  |  461  |  462  |  463  |  464  |  465  |  466  |  467  |  468  |  469  |  470  |  471  |  472  |  473  |  474  |  475  |  476  |  477  |  478  |  479  |  480  |  481  |  482  |  483  |  484  |  485  |  486  |  487  |  488  |  489  |  490  |  491  |  492  |  493  |  494  |  495  |  496  |  497  |  498  |  499  |  500  |  501  |  502  |  503  |  504  |  505  |  506  |  507  |  508  |  509  |  510  |  511  |  512  |  513  |  514  |  515  |  516  |  517  |  518  |  519  |  520  |  521  |  522  |  523  |  524  |  525  |  526  |  527  |  528  |  529  |  530  |  531  |  532  |  533  |  534  |  535  |  536  |  537  |  538  |  539  |  540  |  541  |  542  |  543  |  544  |  545  |  546  |  547  |  548  |  549  |  550  |  551  |  552  |  553  |  554  |  555  |  556  |  557  |  558  |  559  |  560  |  561  |  562  |  563  |  564  |  565  |  566  |  567  |  568  |  569  |  570  |  571  |  572  |  573  |  574  |  575  |  576  |  577  |  578  |  579  |  580  |  581  |  582  |  583  |  584  |  585  |  586  |  587  |  588  |  589  |  590  |  591  |  592  |  593  |  594  |  595  |  596  |  597  |  598  |  599  |  600  |  601  |  602  |  603  |  604  |  605  |  606 

May 11, 2009

The U.S. has a bad habit of imprisoning foreign journalists

Roxana Saberi's plight and American media propaganda - Glenn Greenwald - Salon.com

U.S. journalist Roxana Saberi was freed from an Iranian prison yesterday after outrage over her imprisonment on trumped up charges. But what about all the foreign journalists we incarcerate?

Beginning in 2001, the U.S. held Al Jazeera cameraman Sami al-Haj for six years in Guantanamo with no trial of any kind, and spent most of that time interrogating him not about Terrorism, but about Al Jazeera. For virtually the entire time, the due-process-less, six-year-long imprisonment of this journalist by the U.S. produced almost no coverage -- let alone any outcry -- from America's establishment media, other than some columns by Nicholas Kristof (though, for years, al-Haj's imprisonment was a major media story in the Muslim world). As Kristof noted when al-Haj was finally released in 2007: "there was never any real evidence that Sami was anything but a journalist"; "the interrogators quickly gave up on asking him substantive questions" and "instead, they asked him to spy on Al-Jazeera if he was released;" and "American officials, by imprisoning an Al-Jazeera journalist without charges or meaningful evidence, have done far more to damage American interests in the Muslim world than anything Sami could ever have done."

In Iraq, we imprisoned Associated Press photographer Bilal Hussein -- part of AP's Pulitzer Prize-winning war coverage -- for almost two years with no charges of any kind, after Hussein's photographs from the Anbar province directly contradicted Bush administration claims about the state of affairs there. . . .

We're Just Jealous 'cause We Ain't Them

Look at this fucking hipster E.g.: Sites like this always...

The origin of Mother's Day

Returning Mother's Day to its original meaning. - By Ruth Rosen - Slate Magazine

The women who originally celebrated Mother's Day conceived of it as an occasion to use their status as mothers to protest injustice and war. In 1858, Anna Reeves Jarvis organized Mother's Work Days in West Appalachian communities to protest the lack of sanitation that caused disease-bearing insects and polluted water to sicken or even kill poor workers. In 1870, after witnessing the bloody Civil War, Julia Ward Howe—a Boston pacifist, poet, and suffragist who wrote the "Battle Hymn of the Republic"—proclaimed a special day for mothers to oppose war. Committed to ending all armed conflict, Howe wrote, "Our husbands shall not come to us reeking with carnage. … Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn all that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience."

For the next three decades, Americans celebrated Mother's Days for Peace on June 2. Women political activists of this era fought to end lynching and organized to end child labor, trafficking of women, and consumer fraud. In their view, their moral superiority was grounded in the fact of their motherhood.

When Anna Jarvis died in 1905, her daughter, also named Anna, vowed to honor her mother's political activism by creating a national Mother's Day. The gift card and flower industries also lobbied hard. As an industry publication, the Florists' Review, put it, "This was a holiday that could be exploited." In 1914, Congress responded and proclaimed the second Sunday in May to be Mother's Day.

May 10, 2009

'Odious Column' of Metal

eiffel.jpgThe Eiffel Tower turns 120 on May 15. 'Odious Column' of Metal - WSJ.com
Open to the elements, enveloped in Eiffel's distinctive design, visitors can see and touch parts of the 18,038 pieces of iron (welded together with 2.5 million rivets) as they ascend heavenward. The tower is so beloved that few today remember the storm of vitriol, mockery and lawsuits provoked by its selection as the startling centerpiece of the 1889 Paris Exposition Universelle. (One of the losing entries was a gigantic working guillotine!) Even as Eiffel was breaking ground by the Seine River in February 1887, 47 of France's greatest names decried in a letter to Le Temps the "odious column of bolted metal." What person of good taste, this flock of intellectuals asked, could endure the thought of this "dizzily ridiculous tower dominating Paris like a black and gigantic factory chimney, crushing [all] beneath its barbarous mass"? The revered painters Ernest Meissonier and William-Adolphe Bouguereau, writers Guy de Maupassant and Alexandre Dumas fils, composer Charles Gounod and architect Charles Garnier all signed this epistolary call to arms, stating that "the Eiffel Tower, which even commercial America would not have, is without a doubt the dishonor of Paris."

Ready or Not, Katrina Victims Lose Temporary Housing

Leaving the Trailers - Ready or Not, Katrina Victims Lose Temporary Housing - Series - NYTimes.com

Though more than 4,000 Louisiana homeowners have received rebuilding money only in the last six months, or are struggling with inadequate grants or no money at all, FEMA is intent on taking away their trailers by the end of May. The deadline, which ends temporary housing before permanent housing has replaced it, has become a stark example of recovery programs that seem almost to be working against one another.

Thousands of rental units have yet to be restored, and not a single one of 500 planned “Katrina cottages” has been completed and occupied. The Road Home program for single-family homeowners, which has cost federal taxpayers $7.9 billion, has a new contractor who is struggling to review a host of appeals, and workers who assist the homeless are finding more elderly people squatting in abandoned buildings.

Nonetheless, FEMA wants its trailers back, even though it plans to scrap or sell them for a fraction of what it paid for them.