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May 22, 2012

Soccer is the world's most popular game and also the most corrupt

ESPN.com - All the world is staged
THE WORLD'S MOST popular game is also its most corrupt, with investigations into match fixing ongoing in more than 25 countries. Here's a mere sampling of events since the beginning of last year: Operation Last Bet rocked the Italian Football Federation, with 22 clubs and 52 players awaiting trial for fixing matches; the Zimbabwe Football Association banned 80 players from its national-team selection due to similar accusations; Lu Jun, the first Chinese referee of a World Cup match, was sentenced to five and a half years in prison for taking more than $128,000 in bribes to fix outcomes in the Chinese Super League; prosecutors charged 57 people with match fixing in the South Korean K-League, four of whom later died in suspected suicides; the team director of second-division Hungarian club REAC Budapest jumped off a building after six of his players were arrested for fixing games; and in an under-21 friendly, Turkmenistan reportedly beat Maldives 3-2 in a "ghost match" -- neither country knew about the contest because it never actually happened, yet bookmakers still took action and fixers still profited. Soccer match fixing has become a massive worldwide crime, on par with drug trafficking, prostitution and the trade in illegal weapons. As in those criminal enterprises, the match-fixing industry has been driven by opportunistic greed. According to Interpol figures, sports betting has ballooned into a $1 trillion industry, 70 percent of which is gambled on soccer. The explosive growth reflects the rise of online gambling, which has turned local bookies into global merchants, flooded by money from every continent. Asian bookmakers alone see a $2 billion weekly turnover, according to Eaton. "It's now one huge liquid market," says David Forrest, an economics professor at the University of Salford in Manchester, England, who specializes in the study of sports gambling. "Liquidity is the friend of the fixer. You can put down big bets without notice and without changing the odds against yourself." For the soccer gambler, the buffet of betting options is endless. FIFA recognizes 208 soccer federations, each governing its country's professional leagues and national teams, which are split into several age groups. The total number of pro and national soccer teams worldwide far exceeds 10,000. On sbobet.com, one of the largest legal books in Southeast Asia, a gambler can bet on dozens of matches daily, from the English Premier League to the Indonesian Super League to the Ukrainian youth championships. And the betting options climb exponentially when you consider the dramatic upsurge in real-time propositional bets. Gambling on soccer online now resembles the stock market, with constant fluctuations and instantaneous arbitrage.

May 21, 2012

Democracy Now covers the Chicago NATO protest: Did undercover cops plant terrorism evidence on protesters?

The three guys the media keep saying were going to bomb the mayor's house and Obama's house? The evidence of their bombs are homebrew beer kits. The guys have no records. They are being set up by the Chicago PD. Joe. My. God.: CHICAGO: Three Occupy Activists Charged With Terrorist Plot At NATO Protests

May 09, 2012

Two Long Island doctors charged with running "disability mill," scamming pension fund out of $1 billion

And because New York lets people older than 70 opt out of jury duty, the lawyers for these two sleazeball doctors are making this a fight about jury selection. Jury selection! Do these guys realize that when they steal from a pension fund they are stealing money from their fellow employees? More Long Island Rail Road Retirees Face Fraud Charges - NYTimes.com
Two doctors, Peter J. Ajemian of Syosset and Peter J. Lesniewski of Rockville Centre, both orthopedists, have been accused by prosecutors of running “disability mills,” using unnecessary tests and exaggerated narratives to prepare disability applications for employees who were not disabled. A federal complaint cited 587 workers who had received disability benefits based on the two doctors’ recommendations; those retirees have already received more than $121 million in disability benefit payments, and were scheduled to receive another $274 million, the complaint says. The two doctors (and a third who has died) accounted for about 86 percent of the disability applications filed during the period of the alleged conspiracy, which began in 1998, the complaint says. The fraudulent scheme could cause the federal Railroad Retirement Board to pay unwarranted benefits of more than $1 billion, the complaint added.

May 02, 2012

Is an ESPN columist scamming people on the internet?

Yes. Well, she *was*. This Deadspin article has busted her pretty good though it looks like she still took a lot of cash off people. Click through and read the whole thing. Is An ESPN Columnist Scamming People On The Internet? [UPDATE]