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October 30, 2007

A tribute to Charles Schulz

Comix Experience: The Stuff

By Savage Jeff Lester

But Schulz also tapped into something far darker and more direct, pretty much from that first strip. In it, we see two kids sitting on a step, as a prototypical Charlie Brown skips by, obliviously happy. The one kid talks through all four panels while the other listens attentively: "Well! Here comes ol' Charlie Brown! Good ol' Charlie Brown...yes, sir! Good ol' Charlie Brown...how I hate him!"

Despite all that goo that Newsweek shovelled around about Schulz being a purveyor of quiet and fundamentally decent values, a good chunk of Peanuts is about rejection, and loathing, and the resultant depression and self-hatred that results. Roughly ten years after that debut, here's the opening of a typical strip: "You're a fool, Charlie Brown! I don't know why I waste my time even talking to you!" Unlike your typical schlemiel joke, most of the time there is no reason ever shown for everyone's hatred of Charlie Brown. Walking around throughout the strip, frequently holding his stomach and saying, "I can't stand it," Charlie Brown presents an image of the outsider that we see moving in comic art from Crumb through Clowes. In being true to his childhood (and resulting adulthood), Schulz allowed several generations to be in touch with their outsider status and feelings of inadequacy. Every time I've ever hated the world so much I've gone home, closed all the curtains, and sat in the dark staring at the ceiling, shows the debt I owe to Schulz, as does everyone like me. Short of teaching us to cut down the arm instead of across, he showed a nation of depressives and misanthropes how it was done.

And the language! By making Charlie Brown and all the gang mature in their elocution and their sometimes philosophical conversational subjects, Schulz not only perfected a form of comedic contrast, he allowed himself the freedom to access all his big topics. Within every child, there is an adult waiting to get out, and within every adult there is still the child and the childhood that existed, and Schulz is able to access both vantage points whenever he chooses. Sometimes Charlie Brown is the child being openly loathed, and sometimes he's the adult scarred with self-doubt and anxiety caused by a tough childhood, but he always has the same language, the same body, in either case. It's only as I get older and realize what my childhood has made of me, that I see that Peanuts is very much about how the past and the present exist simultaneously for all of us, inside, in how we see ourselves.

Click through for the whole poodle.

October 27, 2007

Wonderella vs. An American Werewolf in America

"The Non-Adventures of Wonderella" by Justin Pierce

I adore the "Werewolves of London" reference in this strip. "He was drinkin' a pina colada down at Trad'r Vics. His hair was PERFECT. "

October 25, 2007

The Trancecracker

The Trancecracker!

A Jack Chick-esque tract about the dangers of DJ worship.

(via)

October 19, 2007

Abhay plays the bad guy, hates on Cry Yourself to Sleep

The Savage Critic(s): Abhay Thinks Reviewing Comic Books is Really Just a Bad Idea, Period

This comic book is not about anything resembling real people. The term you’re groping for is “hipster wish-fulfillment fantasies”.

Are you a “20-something girl” who’s interested in finding out what “really lurks” in the heart of your boyfriend? If so, allow me to explain and save you having to read this comic book: your boyfriend is bored of looking at the back of your head when you have sex, and prays every night that you were someone, anyone else, not because you’re not pretty but just to relieve the overwhelming, all-consuming boredom. You’re welcome.

As for this “it’ll tell you what it’s like if you’re 20” nonsense—that’s just offensive to me. I’m offended by that. This is a comic that invites the reader to imagine that in their early 20’s, they were like an innocent little bunny rabbit that the world didn’t understand. Because, boo hoo, you were different. Oh! Oh, boo hoo for you! Boo hoo for how sensitive and precious you were in your early 20’s. When will people see your inner bunny rabbit?

October 18, 2007

Achewood on hacking

October 17, 2007

XKCD -- "So, what do you want to do?"

xkcd - A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language - By Randall Munroe

October 12, 2007

This is what Lawful Good heaven looks like

Giant In the Playground Games

XKCD: Exploits of a Mom

xkcd - A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language - By Randall Munroe

October 09, 2007

Get Your War On! vs. Blackwater

www.mnftiu.cc | get your war on | page 68

October 06, 2007

The Savage Critic(s): Marvel tries something unconventional. Yes, Marvel!

The Savage Critic(s): The Omega Effect: Diana ponders 10/3OMEGA THE...

October 05, 2007

The Savage Critic(s): Gumby!

Because I love Gumby, like Rick Geary and worship Bob...