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February 07, 2008

Download free comics through Wowio

WOWIO: Comics & Graphic Novels

There is some good stuff (Alan Moore), some bad stuff (Pantheon by Willingham) and some stuff that is probably NSFW (XXXena: Warrior Pornstar).

I see dozens of curious titles. Color me intrigued.

February 06, 2008

Bookslut's Best Graphic Novels of 2007

I ain't aheerd of a one of 'um. It could...

Freakangels

2008 02 15...

February 05, 2008

Gail Simone vs. Dave Sim

glamourpuss Dave Sim - Tartsville

Dave Sim, author of Cerberus and misogynist of no small degree, has been making the rounds of comic messageboards lately to promote his new comic. His new comic is apparently partly an excuse for him to practice drawing models, and partly an expose on the fashion industry.

He's been surprisingly well-received on most of these boards, considering he is something of a punchline these days. And then fabulous Gail Simone shows up. Gail Simone, for those of you who don't know, writes comics. She worked on DC's Birds of Prey for many years and always turned out a smart and fun book. She is one of the most solid writers working in comics today.

Gail is also a fan of Dave Sim's and a woman, which puts her in a difficult place re: his misogyny. She finds him on this message board and asks many thoughtful questions that get to the heart of teh matter, and which Dave Sim almost entirely ignores.

I wish I had popcorn.

[Gail Simone]:Okay, my first real question. I owned a hair salon for many years and thus have browsed and amassed a monstrous amount of fashion magazines (in fact, they're commonly sent to salons at no charge for advertising reasons). I agree with a couple statements I've seen you post (if I remember correctly).

One, that their message is conflicted, or represents a conflicted readership, and two, that the primary audience seems to be straight women and gay men, at least in my experience in a decade as a hairstylist.

Given that you've gone after, at length and for many years, the "feminist/homosexualist" axis (I'm tempted to add "of evil" as a nod to both comic fans and your support of George W., kidding, kidding), would you say that your book is aimed more at those whose intellects and ethics you respect more, ie. straight white males?

What would you say the appeal of this book would be for someone who through birth or choice, happens to be in that axis? Or is it meant to appeal to them at all?

Thank you, and as I've said often, I was a huge fan of Cerebus during a time where I was so broke it was often a choice between buying food or the latest issue.

Whitechapel's Comics Window

Whitechapel | Warren's Pub Table: The Comics WindowComics creators (of...

January 31, 2008

Mojo reviews comics: January 30, 2008

Y the Last Man #60: This is the final issue. There will be no more Yorick Brown. No more Beth(s). No more Dr. Mann. No more 355. No more Ampersand the monkey. I've been following this comic excitedly from day one. I've talked many friends whose only comics experience was Sandman into reading Y. They've all loved it. It's been a beautiful run. It highlights exactly what Vertigo does better than anyone else: long-form, character-driven sci-fi pieces. I'm not going to spoil anything here. No one should have this spoiled. What I will say is that by the end I was crying. I'm crying a bit now, even as I type this. It's my Irish blood; what can I do? Let me just say this: these characters feel real. That's what Brian K Vaughan and Pia Guerra have done here. In the guise of a coming-of-age, sci-fi, post-apocalyptic travelogue epic they have sneakily created some nuanced characters with real emotional resonance.

Ultimate Spider-Man #118: Peter, MJ, Kitty Pryde, that bald guy, the Human Torch, Iceman and MJ's best friend Liz deal with Harry's death by going to the beach and letting themselves act like teenagers for a few hours. It's a nice pause after the relentless Osborn-action of the past issues. The ending scene (and the spoilerific cover) pay cutesy homage to the Spider-Man & His Amazing Friends cartoon of the early 80s. Bendis, when he writes USM, is just on.

New Avengers Annual #2: Contrast the confident, well-paced Bendis of USM with this Bendis. The Avengers Bendis. The flailing, throwing every idea against the wall to see what sticks Bendis. It's fun at times, but the Avengers has been so decompressed across this run that any action at all that moves the plot forward is welcome. Continuity wise, I have no idea where this fits in with One More Day and Messiah Complex and Iron Fist's own series and everything else. The Avengers, like Billy Pilgrim, have become unstuck in time. There are fun moments scattered throughout however, and it's always fun to look at The Hood's army of super-villains and try to name as many as you can (seriously, the Mandrill?). But I have no idea why I keep buying this comic. It's just not that good.

January 29, 2008

Honesty in Comic Book Covers

Mightygodking.com � Blog Archive � Honesty In Comic Book Covers, #4 (The Bitter Edition)

The Order has been cancelled as of issue #10. It was a great series, with well-crafted characters.