1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110 

June 22, 2008

No-Prize Dept.:
Would the last editor to give up on DC's continuity turn out the lights?

tl;dr: Grant Morrison threw a spanner in the works from Mt. Olympus, and everyone else just shakes thier heads in disbelief. via | CBR | Brian Hibbs | Tilting at Windmills | PUBLISH AND/OR PERISH
It was roughly two, two and half years ago that I opined to Marvel’s David Gabriel that I thought they’d be able to get a ten point lead on DC if they worked a little harder. That’s now grown to a 20 point lead, or, to put it another way, Marvel is about 50% larger than DC these days... Anyway, its been an ugly week for DC, with Grant Morrison publically disassociating himself from “Countdown to Final Crisis,”
Newsarama | Grant Morrison on Final Crisis #1 |
GM: Well, the way it worked out was that I started writing Final Crisis #1 in early 2006, around the same time as the 52 series was starting to come out, so Final Crisis was more a continuation of plot threads from Seven Soldiers and 52 than anything else. Final Crisis was partly-written and broken down into rough issue-by-issue plots before Countdown was even conceived, let alone written. And J.G. was already working on designs and early layouts by the time Countdown started. There wasn’t really much opportunity, or desire, to modify our content at that stage. ...when Countdown was originally being discussed, it was just a case of me saying ‘Here’s issue 1 of Final Crisis and a rough breakdown of the following six issues. As long as you guys leave things off where Final Crisis begins, we‘ll be fine.’ Obviously, I would have preferred it if the New Gods hadn’’t been spotlighted at all, let alone quite so intensively before I got a chance to bring them back but I don’t run DC and don’t make the decisions as to how and where the characters are deployed. NRAMA: So. So in essence, you were handed a plate where between Death of the New Gods and Countdown, Orion appeared to have died twice. Picking up with him here, did he wander to the docks from the battle in Countdown #1, or are his terminal injuries from something else? GM: Again, bear in mind that Countdown only finished last month so Final Crisis was already well underway long before Countdown and although I’ve tried to avoid contradicting much of the twists and turns of that book as I can with the current Final Crisis scripts, the truth is, we were too far down the road of our own book to reflect everything that went on in Countdown, hence the disconnects that online commentators, sadly, seem to find more fascinating than the stories themselves.... The way I see it readers can choose to spend the rest of the year fixating on the plot quirks of a series which has ended, or they can breathe a sight of relief, settle back and enjoy the shiny new DC universe status quo we’re setting up in the pages of Final Crisis and its satellite books. I’m sure both of these paths to enlightenment will find adherents of different temperaments.
CBR | Greg Hatcher | Friday’s Editorial Conference
rant Morrison blithely telling Newsarama that as far as he was concerned, plot points in Countdown To Final Crisis and Death of the New Gods shouldn’t have any bearing on Final Crisis since he’d written his story before those two series came out. This despite the fact that A) they directly contradict what Morrison wrote in his Final Crisis script. And B) the other two series were released first, with one billed as being the direct prequel leading up to Grant’s book.... Does Mr. Morrison work in some kind of sterile bubble? Has he not ever met a comics fan? Has he blanked out all his years on JLA?... My first thought ... was, who the hell were the editors on those books and what were they doing?... Put continuity debates off to the side for a minute. Let’s not forget that DC Comics is a business. A business where the boss just announced a major new policy. I mean it was in all the goddamn books shipping that week. This is how it’s going to be. Continuity is a big deal for us, line-wide. We take our fictional history SERIOUSLY, as seriously as you do, loyal readers. Our books will be an unfolding tapestry of consistency. Then, just a month later, comes a major gaffe — okay, perceived gaffe — in the biggest book DC is putting out this summer. The one they’ve been hyping for a year.... ...we have Grant Morrison going off the reservation and telling Newsarama, well, yeah, whatever, people shouldn’t worry about it. Right on the heels of his editor’s boss announcing to Grant’s readership that hell YEAH, this matters, we all worry about it, we’re putting a special logo on the books so you will all know how MUCH we worry about it. Bear in mind that it’s not about the merits of continuity. Bottom line, it’s a writer declaring that the new company policy (the policy that is barely a month old) is now inoperative, at least for the book he’s working on… which is, oh yeah, the most important book of the line this summer.
Meanwhile: The Beat | Chuck Dixon and the DCU — UPDATED

June 21, 2008

FreakAngles Interlude 02: My dog ate my homework

Backing up your drive: Serious Business. FreakAngles Interlude 02
It’s another skip week. Paul’s computer went down a few days ago, with the next episode of FREAKANGELS stuck in it.