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July 01, 2009

Penny Arcade's "Lookouts" part 2

Penny Arcade! - Guest Lookouts, Page 2 Guest drawn by Becky Dreistadt.

June 29, 2009

What do you think the dog-collar is for?

PCL LinkDump: Paws Off, She's Taken *via Chris Sims*

Achewood commemorates Michael Jackson

Achewood -- June 28, 2009

June 28, 2009

An iTunes for comics?

Comic Book Resources > CBR News: HeroesCon: Longbox Digital Comics
Rantz Hoseley, the editor behind Image's “Comic Book Tattoo” anthology of comics inspired by Tori Amos, introduced his latest endeavor at Heroes Con this weekend. Longbox, a digital comics platform similar to iTunes, is expected to launch later this year as a free download for Mac, PC, and Linux. Developed by Quicksilver Software, Longbox comics can be download for a suggested price point of $.99 per issue, with the potential for block and subscription pricing. The first two publishers confirmed for Longbox are Top Cow and BOOM! Studios. CBR News caught up with Hoseley to discuss the details of Longbox and its potential impact.

“Everyone's been talking now for half a decade about the holy grail of digital comics, and how do you solve that problem: How do you make something that everyone gets on board with?” Hoseley told CBR. “And rather than just kind of jump into it willy-nilly, we've done a lot of research and actual development on the platform prior to even discussing it with any publishers.”

In an effort to make the Longbox platform appealing to publishers, the software toolset used for creating the secure digital files integrates with publishers' existing production process, plugging in to Adobe InDesign and Quark to add an “Export as Longbox”-type menu option. “The problem with a lot of digital comic solutions is that they require per-comic either adaptation or alteration in converting print comics to digital, in order to customize it to the platform. That immediately incurs an overhead cost that the publisher has to recoup they're even at a break-even point,” Hoseley explained. “Depending on what that cost is, immediately that's a negative for the publisher, especially when monthly sales are dropping, cover prices are going up and distribution costs are going up. The last thing they want is another expense on something that isn't proven. One of our keys is having a toolset that works as a natural extension of their existing production path so that it doesn't take additional production time or effort to simply create a secure digital version of the print comic that they're already producing as part of their ongoing publishing line.”

The A to Z of Awesome

Neill's blog These truly are all awesome. J is especially hilarious, but I have a huge soft spot for MODOK so . . .

June 26, 2009

FreakAngels | Episode 0060

FreakAngels | Episode 0060 FA0060.JPG FREAKANGELS is a free, weekly, ongoing comic written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Paul Duffield.

June 25, 2009

This is why Neil Gaiman didn't write a 20th anniversary Sandman comic

The Inkwell Bookstore Blog: Neil Gaiman B*tch-Slaps DC
In an interview with Jam.canoe.com, Mr. Gaiman explained the dearth of new Sandman stories for the series' 20th anniversary like this: “I wanted to do a 20th anniversary story and it broke mostly because DC Comics would have loved me to do a 20th anniversary story at the same terms that were agreed upon in 1987 when I was a 26-year-old unknown. And my thought was, ‘You know what guys, it really doesn’t work like that.’ I wasn’t going to do a deal at the same terms we had in 1987 and they were not willing to do any better than that.”

June 23, 2009

This Modern World

This Modern World | Salon Comics