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August 10, 2009

Empowered as the true inheritor of Wonder Woman's legacy of feminism, objectification, and the murky space in-between

The Hooded Utilitarian: Lose the Girdle, Get Empowered (OOCWVG) I am unabashedly a fan of Berlatsky's criticism--this essay shows exactly why. Noah has been spending some time these past few months analyzing the character of Wonder Woman--her creation, her subsequent uses, her legacy. He makes the connections to Adam Warren's Empowered look so effortless that I curse myself for not seeing them earlier.
. . . Even more important than the humor, though, is the fact that Warren seems to really care about his heroine. Empowered could easily have turned into a series of dumb blonde joke...but instead, Emp comes across as an incredibly likable character, way more competent and courageous than she or her teammates are willing to credit. As I said, Warren starts out by highlighting her unhappiness and humilitation, a la Charlie Brown — but he quickly heads for less depressing territory, giving her a yummy ex-evil minion as a boyfriend, and incidentally creating one of the best couples in super-hero comics. Thugalicious (does he have a name? He must, but I can't find it. Oh well.) is incredibly sweet, setting up his villainous cohorts for defeat after defeat at Emp's hands because "this stuff makes you happy, dinnit?" — and, less selflessly, because Emp "always gets completely sexed up and out of control after every super-hero outing." In return, when thugalicious' cohorts wise up and almost kill him, Emp, kicks the door over and with uncharacteristic competence blasts through a roomful of minions to get to her man (said man remarking, with heartfelt enthusiasm "Bad Ass!") The end of this scene is pretty great as well. Generally when super-heroes save their loved ones, they're pretty blase about it — along the lines of, "Aha, here I am again to rescue you just in time. You never doubted me, of course!" Emp, on the other hand, falls apart, weepingly cussing him out for being a macho asshole and getting himself in this pickle. It seems — and I think, is — such a natural reaction that it took me days to realize how unusual it was for the genre. . . .
Note: if you haven't read Warren's Empowered you're missing out on solid characterization, deft plotting, and enough cheesecake art to decorate the nosecones of every plane ever flown.

Fans behaving badly

Avengers Avenged | SuperFunAdventureTime! Comics fans are a cowardly and superstitious lot, and a very entitled one. Linked here is a story about fans at the WizardWorld convention abusing comic writer/artist/pariah Rob Liefield. Liefield is infamous for his insanely-popular anatomically-impossible artistic style in the 90s. He's often cited as being one of the people who "ruined" comics in the 90s. Of course, he couldn't have "ruined" comics if fans hadn't obsessively purchased his comics, right? But fanatics always turn on their heroes in the end.
“What’s this?” asked Javier, the dude who was working the booth we were at. “We’re going to by a copy of How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way, then he’s going to give it to Rob Liefeld,” said Mike. Javier was awestruck. “How much is this?” I ask. “All trades are five dollars, but if you’re giving that to Rob Liefeld, then I…I…well, I can chip in,” said Javier, digging through his wallet. “Here’s two bucks.” I give the man three. “I’ll be back,” I tell Javier.
The story is funny if you consider artists as something less (or more) than human. But mostly these guys are just being dicks.

August 07, 2009

Cliff Chiang salutes John Hughes with a Teen Titans/Breakfast Club mashup

cliffchiang.com
“Dear Batman: We accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in Bat-detention for whatever it is we did wrong, but we think you’re crazy for making us write an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us: in the simplest terms, in the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is an archer, and a speedster, and a swimmer, a princess, and an acrobat. Does that answer your question? Sincerely yours, The Teen Titans.” Thank you, John Hughes. Rest in peace.

FreakAngels | Episode 0064

FreakAngels | Episode 0064 fa 0064.JPG FREAKANGELS is a free, weekly, ongoing comic written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Paul Duffield.

August 05, 2009

it may be good for you - SDCC and Frontalot

Sd Comicon '09 fumetti starring MC Frontalot: it may be good for you.

August 03, 2009

Abhay Khosla's Bram Stoker's Dracula -- Chapter 2

twiststreet - Abhay Khosla's Bram Stoker's Dracula: Chapter Two

July 31, 2009

Achewood always knows just what to say

Achewood -- July 7, 2006 *via Chris Sims*

July 30, 2009

Do you read Something Positive? (you should)

something positive: archive *Thanks, Sonja!*

July 28, 2009

Abhay Khosla's Bram Stoker's Dracula

Image Comics :: View topic - Bram Stoker's Dracula The rest at the link.

July 26, 2009

Comics?

KevinSmith (ThatKevinSmith) on Twitter
Weirdest moment of SanDiego ComiCon Q&A: was actually asked a comic-related question. I was like "Where the fuck do you think you are, sir?"