1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110 

November 24, 2009

True stories of the core marvel universe

True Stories of the 'Core Marvel Universe' - ComicsAlliance.com Chris Sims recently dealt with an obnoxious commenter who said that (*ahem*) the Punisher being turned into a variation of Frankenstein's Monster didn't fit in the core Marvel universe. Seriously. Sims brings the pain here brilliantly pointing out all of the absolutely ridiculous things that exist in Marvel continuity.
In the Core Marvel Universe, the most popular person is a 120 year-old Canadian berserker samurai who has who has been to the moon and was in love with a psychic who destroyed an alien planet and came back from the dead, married to both Japanese royalty and a green-haired terrorist, and had a child with a woman from a hidden region of Antarctica where dinosaurs and cavemen live. When he is not fighting his enemies -- most of whom are versions of himself, some of whom have claws made of lasers -- he reaffirms his status as as tough-as-nails loner as a member of at least three superhero teams.

The AVClub's best comics of the decade

The best comics of the ’00s | Best Of The Decade | Comics Panel | The A.V. Club An interesting list. The problem with this sort of project is that a) you will ALWAYS forget something amazing (like Scott Pilgrim) and b) everyone has a favorite you will overlook (like Scott Pilgrim). The list isn't too surprising. You have your All-Star Superman, your Bone, your Blankets. You have a bunch of the critical favorites like Pyonyang and Persepolis. But then you also get a few oddballs beauties, like Kupperman's "Tales Designed to Thrizzle."
Achewood, Chris Onstad (achewood.com, 2001-present) This was the decade when webcomics tried to step up and prove they deserve a place alongside the great newspaper strips of the past, but Chris Onstad’s Achewood is one of the few that’s proven worthy of the challenge. Hiding some powerfully good storytelling behind simple art, Achewood quickly evolved from a reliably funny gag strip to a still funny but surprisingly deep character-driven comedy that’s stayed sharp no matter what bizarre direction it’s veered in. Ray and Roast Beef, the central funny-animal protagonists—human-like in their bad behavior, if nothing else—form the strip’s spine, and Onstad has found humor and meaning in their enjoyably quirky argot and exploration of the meaning of adult friendships. When he wants to go for more broad or surreal humor, he’s been able to draw on a bench of supporting characters as deep as any great sitcom’s. . . . Promethea Comics fans learned a long time ago not to count out Alan Moore, so it’s no surprise that the man considered by many to be the greatest writer in the history of the medium was responsible for an ongoing comics series of exceptional quality this decade. What is surprising is how the series developed. Originally intended as Moore’s sophisticated riff on Wonder Woman, Promethea was an exceptional superhero comic from the start, but Moore grew bored with it. So rather than continuing to crank out stories in a more-or-less traditional format—or abandoning the book altogether—Moore decided to turn Promethea into a freewheeling exegesis on magic, philosophy, transcendental spirituality, and the nature of fiction. Moore’s scripts grew ever more discursive, and artist J.H. Williams III shadowed him every step of the way, providing innovative, experimental visuals that helped turn the stories into something much more symbolic and meaningful than some didactic lecture on mysticism. Like the best of Moore’s work, Promethea began somewhere familiar, and landed somewhere far stranger.

November 20, 2009

FreakAngels | Episode 0076

FreakAngels | Episode 0076 fa0076.JPG FREAKANGELS is a free, weekly, ongoing comic written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Paul Duffield.

If Even Dorkin ran the newspaper comic strips . . .

Your Daily Dose of FUN: If I ran the newspaper comic strips… at Comics212

November 18, 2009

Hipsters Ruin Everything

Hark, a vagrant: 228 Kate Beaton rules.

November 17, 2009

Romance Story with Happy Ending

Your Daily Dose of FUN: Romance Story at Comics212

November 15, 2009

Achewood ranges from the mediocre to the sublime

Achewood -- November 15, 2009 Today it is sublime.

November 14, 2009

FreakAngels | Episode 0075

FreakAngels | Episode 0075 fa0075.JPG FREAKANGELS is a free, weekly, ongoing comic written by Warren Ellis and illustrated by Paul Duffield.

November 11, 2009

Achewood: Fuck You Friday

Achewood -- September 12, 2008 *via Chris Sims*

November 08, 2009

A Waste of Time -- Webcomics by Rick Worley

A.P.E. Update | A Waste of Time Another one of the standouts at APE for me was Rick Worley's delightfully evil webcomics starring what can only be called an opinionated, gay bunny going through the same post-college craziness we all go through. It's a sharp and talented autobiographical comic. Don't let the bunny fool you.

November 06, 2009

The Moron Bomb

Your Daily Dose of FUN: The Moron Bomb! at Comics212 This is pretty much a perfect three panel sci-fi story.