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June 07, 2011

The Savage Critics discuss Chester Brown's PAYING FOR IT

I find these roundtable discussions an absolute joy to read. Click through to see most of the Savage Critics discuss the problematic quasi-memoir/quasi-polemic about paying for sex. Savage Symposium: PAYING FOR IT part 1 (of 4) | Savage Critics
Chris Eckert: . . . On that level, PAYING FOR IT didn’t work for me as a memoir. I knew going in that Chester Brown was a Canadian cartoonist that championed the patronization of sex workers over monogamous romance. I knew he was friends with Seth and Joe Matt, and that he used to date that lady from MuchMusic. I think I even knew he was a libertarian. If the reader didn’t know any of that, they can read the dust jacket of the book or skim his concise Wikpedia entry. Brown’s decision to minimize any aspects of his life that didn’t involve being a john is understandable, if frustrating. Like Abhay, I think his conversations with Matt and Seth were the most illuminating and engaging narrative spine. But to structure the book as essentially a catalog of all his paid orgasms, and then seemingly take pains to genericize all but the Yelp Review-iest portions of said orgasms made large stretches of the book a slog for me. For an act that he posits is so ‘sacred’, he might as well have written a ‘memoir’ about all of the times in the past eight years that he’s scored cocaine, or shoplifted a book, or shit in someone’s hat. Actually, I bet all of those would have more variety in their telling. Unless of course Brown decided that to ‘protect’ others that he would draw all of the hats as a Seth-style fedora, and change the names of the stolen books. As a polemic, it succeeded in feeling like a polemic. But I had the same reaction as Tucker to the level of argumentation. It didn’t help that a few years ago I read Against Love: A Polemic — at the behest of a Canadian girl, now that I think of it, what’s with Canadians? — and it covered much of the same ground, except it was written by a college professor who understands how to argue and cite resources. I didn’t find it any more compelling than Seth’s argument, but I could at least admire the structure.

June 02, 2011

PeanuTweeter, funny tweets in the mouth of Peanuts characters

Peanutweeter, Hilarious Tweets as Peanuts Cartoons

Kate Beaton's SPIDER-MAN

Hark, a vagrant: 308

May 31, 2011

DC Comics to relaunch every comic with a new #1 issue

And here are Brian Hibbs' reactions. My gut reaction is: this is fucking insane. DC comics haven't been very good for years now. Weak writing. Terrible characterizations that vary with the wind. And "events" that utterly destroy any flow or plotting over the long term. Seriously. This will not help. Preliminary thoughts on DC’s announcement | Savage Critics
3) full line-wide day and day is potentially huge because of the ripple impact it might have. It will take very very very few current customers moving channels to have a catastrophic cascade impact along and down the chain. Maybe as little as 3-5%? If we’re not netting more NEW readers (and I DO NOT MEAN “Marvel readers switching loyalty”) (And see above) we’re really running the risk of the entire comics market collapsing in fairly fast order — and I’m including things that aren’t superheroes. 4) this smells more like a jumping off point to me, for a lot of current readers — especially the “super fans”. I wonder what Garret thinks? 5) There was a time to do this: after the First CRISIS. Or maybe after the “Final” one. I don’t think the economy/market is (at all) in the right place to absorb this right now. 6) FIFTY TWO new superhero #1s? Are there 52 strong creative teams out there? Editors who know how to shepherd a story properly? Seriously, DC hasn’t shown the editorial strength to have more than 8-12 (maybe) “on all cylinders” have they? I’M NOT TRYING TO BE MEAN ON THIS — but the consumer reality in the comics market is that readers judge this kind of initiative by the “WORST” element of it, not the BEST. 7) Fuck, they should have staggered out the launch over a few months… 1 (or 2, maybe 3) new books a week until they were up to their “right” number. I bet a LOT of people would try the “new” DC if the DCU was just 12 titles total in month #1

May 25, 2011

Manta-Man meets Captain America

Manta-Man by Chad Sell - Manta-Man meets Captain America

May 23, 2011

Penny Arcade vs Kickstarter

Penny Arcade! - Dickstarter

May 22, 2011

Kate Beaton's Julius Caesar is amazing

Hark, a vagrant: 307

May 21, 2011

Wonderella vs The Rapture

The Non-Adventures of Wonderella � Archive -- Evading RAPTURE