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June 02, 2014

This #YesAllWomen comic was banned by the NYT

Apparently Kupperman and Rees' comic about male entitlement ruffled a few too man feathers at the New York Times. The Comic Not Fit to Print — The Comic Not Fit to Print

May 25, 2014

How a folklorist used Superman to dismantle the Klan

To fight a post-war resurgence of the Klan, a folklorist infiltrated them and released their secrets in Superman radio serials. How Superman singlehandedly thwarted the Ku Klux Klan | Dangerous Minds
Our story begins with an intrepid young folklorist and activist from Florida named Stetson Kennedy. He noticed that the Klan was experiencing a resurgence—as an example, a few weeks after V-J Day, the Klan burned a 300-foot cross on the face of Stone Mountain near Atlanta (!)—one Klansman later said that the gesture was intended “to let the n*ggers know the war is over and that the Klan is back on the market.” The fiercely committed Kennedy decided to infiltrate the group and expose its secrets. He was quite successful in this—for example, he learned that when a traveling Klan member wanted to find other Klansmen in an unfamiliar part of the country, he would ask for a “Mr. Ayak”—“Ayak” standing for “Are You a Klansman?” The desired response was “Yes, and I also know a Mr. Akai”—“A Klansman Am I.” When he took his information to the local authorities, he found, much to his surprise, little inclination to act on his findings: The Klan had become powerful enough that even the police were hesitant to take action against it. Eventually he realized that he needed a different approach. In the 1940s, Superman was a radio sensation—children all over the country were following his exploits ravenously. Kennedy decided to approach the makers of the radio serial to see if they would be interested in an epic “Superman vs. the Klan” plotline. He learned that they were interested in such a thing. . . .

April 18, 2014

XKCD on free speech

I should probably bookmark this image to share with every forum warrior and troll who think being told to shut up is a violation of their rights. xkcd: Free Speech

December 17, 2013

All I Need To Write

A lovely comic by Grant Snider. All I Need To Write by Incidental Comics

November 22, 2013

On DC comics' biggest problem--they are perpetually playing catch-up to Marvel

When Sims gets into his let's-recontextualize-the-history-comics-without-the-bullshit mode he is goddamn riveting. Ask Chris #172: 'The Problem'
DC was focused on superheroes, and since they had the most popular superhero ever created, and the second most popular superhero ever created, and the third, and the fourth and the fifth, and Aquaman, what’s the point of even trying to compete with them? How do you even begin to take on Superman? Well, if you’re Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and you’ve been watching all this go down for the past 20 years, it’s easy. You just sit down one day and reinvent the superhero comic. No big deal. Which is exactly what they did. I’ve talked about this before, how the Marvel comics are deceptively simple in how they work. They’re undeniably adventure comics, the same kind of superhero stories that DC’s publishing, only they add in the stuff they’d been working on for the past decade. The twists and horrified reactions of the monster comics, the angsty, unrequited yearning of the romance books, and just bundle it all together in a book that doesn’t look like anything else on the stands. That last part is easy, because at this point, the only thing worth mentioning on the stands is DC, and they all have a pretty similar look. Wayne Boring, Al Plastino, Curt Swan and Kurt Schaffenberger are all phenomenal artists (Schaffenberger is probably the most underrated and overlooked Superman artist of all time, and his work is flat-out gorgeous), but to a certain extent, their art all sort of looks the same. There are differences and styles and you can tell them apart, sure, but they’re definitely part of the same school. Jack Kirby is not. So in 1961, Kirby and Lee take a gamble and put out Fantastic Four #1, a new kind of superhero comic… . . .

November 17, 2013

Gender essentialism isn't real

It's controversial, but some of us really do believe that women are people. Men and Women! They Talk Like People! -- Sociological Images

November 08, 2013

6 Easy Ways for Millenials to Get Ahead in Today's Economy

If only all those millenials weren't so damn lazy. Sarcastic Comic Explains Six ‘Totally Easy’ Ways for Millennials to Get Ahead in Today’s Economy