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February 25, 2010

I Haven't Seen Avatar, but this Dog Kid's Review is Pretty Good

YouTube - Blue hippy cats my avatar review (via sci-fi...

Voice: Smith's Cop Out so cliche-ridden it just might work

Tweets Smith in return: "Many thanks for absolutely getting it. I need not read another COP OUT review after yours." http://www.villagevoice.com/2010-02-23/film/kevin-smith-s-cop-out-so-clich-eacute-filled-it-just-might-work
Like most of Smith's movies, from Clerks to Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back to Zach and Miri Make a Porno, Cop Out tracks a small arc of maturation for dudes who filter their own lives through popular culture. There was a sincere love letter to the transformative power of filmmaking baked into Porno, but its impact was diluted by what felt like strained overtures to the Apatow audience. On the contrary, Cop Out works as a love letter to film fandom, and, amid the ample violence and genitalia jokes, its strength is its sincerity. Working with a full-on studio budget for the first time in his decade-and-a-half career, Smith is still making movies about guys just like him. It may be masturbatory, but it's also some kind of creative integrity.

February 05, 2010

What if Wes Anderson directed the Spoder-Man reboot?

February 02, 2010

Here's your Lost Bingo card

Print our Lost bingo cards and play along with the premiere | SCI FI Wire

February 01, 2010

Geoff Klock on the end of Dollhouse

Remarkable: The End of Dollhouse I totally agree with professor Klock here: every episode in the last half of season two feels like a Big Damn Finale from a different season. And suddenly the show that was meandering or dragging its feet or giving us lackluster one-off episodes is the amazing Joss-engine we all hoped it'd be. What they did here in the last half of the season will go down in the books as a crowning moment of awesome.
I am not sure what happened in the writers room next, but it made for striking as hell television. They must have known cancellation was imminent. Everyone was SHOCKED the show got a second season at all. New Dollhouses episodes were getting worse ratings than House Reruns. I think what most writers would have done is kept their best ideas for next time, maybe for a Dollhouse Movie or some other project with a similar theme. You expect them to let the clock run out, phone it in, and then go home and lick their wounds. Or turn it into a comic book or something. But these guys did something I feel like I have never seen before -- they went for goddamn broke. They took out the show bible, with all their best ideas for like the next five or six years or more -- and ran ALL OF THEM in the last 5 episodes. Every episode became like a different season finale. In a world with LOST this was like watching a show on crack. It was not always perfect, but rather than let us vaguely bemoan what the show could have been, they kind of SHOWED us in fastforward. The sheer energy and frequency of ideas was exciting, like nothing else on TV. The next episode jumped forward three months, for kind of no reason, and now Echo is post-human, able to access every skill she was ever imprinted with -- and she loves Ballard, the long simmering plot suddenly brought home with a slam. In the same episode DeWitt hands Rossum the plans for Topher's doomsday device -- a machine that can wipe anyone, anywhere (an extension of something he invented for the Perrin story, only one episode earlier). And Echo returns to the Dollhouse undercover and fully aware. Imagine that as a season finale and it is perfect and big -- as a seventh episode it is downright excessive. (and not for nothing, but this should have been the PILOT.) . . .
Much more at the link.

January 28, 2010

R.I.P. Miramax

News: The Age of Miramax Films is Over | Latino Review
It's been a long time coming, and the writing was on the wall, but it's still sad to hear that as of today, Miramax is officially closed for business. The news comes to us from The Wrap, which informs us that the end of Miramax will leave 80 people without work and six movies, that had been awaiting distribution, on the shelves. Despite years at the top and countless hitmaking releases -- think Reservoir Dogs, The Piano, Pulp Fiction and countless other groundbreaking flicks -- Miramax did have its share of flops and lackluster releases in recent years. But most troubling was this past October, when Disney announced that it would reduce both Miramax's staff and the number of films on its roster. Though there has been talk that the Weinsten Brothers, who originally founded Miramax and made it the powerhouse that it was for three decades, wanted to buy the name of the studio back, the price ($1.5 billion) looks to be a bit too high for them and anyone else.