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October 02, 2010

How The Social Network gets it all wrong

Jose Antonio Vargas: The Social Disconnect -- How Hollywood Misread Facebook
And it's a movie that, at its core, stands on one glaring false premise: Zuckerberg as a flat-eyed, borderline autistic, humorless guy, a consummate outsider who wanted badly to get into one of Harvard's "final" clubs, his considerable coding skills reduced to social awkwardness. In other words, the geek as the "other." The lonely nerd, sitting alone in front of his computer, seeking connection. The friendless Zuckerberg creating Facebook to make friends and get a girl. There's something that feels quite dated and very 1990s about all of this, like the filmmakers never bothered to meet some of the geeksters -- geeks and hipsters -- at Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, etc. who fuel the social media renaissance in Silicon Valley. Zuckerberg is presented as an alien from a faraway computer programming space, instead of a leading member of an entrepreneurial generation who's grown up with the Internet and now tops Vanity Fair's ranking of the New Establishment, ahead of Steve Jobs, the Google guys and Rupert Murdoch. In the film, Zuckerberg's character lacks context. He just is. Zuckerberg, mind you, is no saint. A string of instant messages he sent while he was in college has been embarrassing and damaging to his reputation. On the whole, his views on privacy and his goal of making the world "a more open place" push way too many buttons to count. But Hollywood's stereotypical portrait of the introverted uber-geek has already gotten some in the tech community -- even those critical of Zuckerberg -- all riled up. Anil Dash, the blogging pioneer and frequent critic of the Facebook CEO, told me: "The movie is written in the abstract, based on what they feel Facebook, and the social Web, represent. It's exoticism. It's the 1940s, when you had a white actor in yellow-face play a Chinese character, you know? Those foreigners talk like this, and it's why they're inscrutable and evil." Added Jeff Jarvis, a long-time chronicler of new media and author of What Would Google Do?: "This is all about snobbery, about dismissing all this Internet stuff. The filmmakers didn't give any value to what Zuckerberg made. How can they say that they understand him if they don't understand his creation? It's dismissive of the 500 million or so people who are on Facebook. It's intellectually lazy. It's insulting."

Wonder Woman tv show coming in 2011 (probably)

Blog@Newsarama -- Wonder Woman headed to small screen once again
David E. Kelley (creator of such hits as Ally McBeal and several other TV favorites) is writing and producing a new show centering around DC’s Wonder Woman, Deadline reports. This project is presumed to fill the void once Smallville ends this season, so it’s up in the air as of now if this is a show about Wonder Woman, or Diana, the Amazonian Princess. With the live-action movie constantly in developmental hell, and the animated movie being quite the success (even outselling Green Lantern: First Flight) a TV show would be the perfect fit for fans of the character to get that fix. I think Kelley has the creative know-how that could bring this show to a broad audience. We haven’t seen live-action Wondy since the 70’s with the famous Lynda Carter TV show that a lot of us grew up on.

September 23, 2010

Let's Ask a Baby: Are Breasts Appropriate for Children?

Stupid puritan country. Katy Perry is Too Hot for Elmo - KDAF
Katy Perry and Elmo’s “Hot and Cold” rendition on Sesame Street has been circulating the Internet for days, and that’s where it will stay. The segment was due to air this coming Monday. But parents said it was too racy, complaining about Perry’s low-cut dress. Some parents say it’s completely inappropriate, and others say their kids wouldn’t have noticed. Nonetheless, Sesame Street responded. They say the show “has always been written on two levels, for the child and adult… We also value our viewer’s opinions and particularly those of parents.”
YouTube - Katy Perry sings "Hot N Cold" with Elmo on Sesame Street!