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March 06, 2012

Heil Honey I'm home!

This is an actual tv show aired on the BBC in 1990. It's a parody of 1950s American-style sitcoms. But it stars Hitler and Eva Braun. It was quickly canceled. Wikipedia says: "The show centres on fictionalised versions of Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun, who live next door to a Jewish couple, Arny and Rosa Goldenstein. The show's plot is centred on Hitler's inability to get along with his neighbours. A caption at the beginning of the episode presented the series as a 'lost' sitcom from the 50s, recently re-discovered. The show spoofed elements of 1950s and 1960s American sitcoms such as Leave It to Beaver and I Love Lucy, including the corny title, light (even vacuous) plots and dialogue, and unwarranted applause whenever a character appeared on screen. The plot of episode 1 involved Adolf telling Eva of the impending arrival of Neville Chamberlain, and begging her not to tell the Goldensteins. Of course, Eva lets it slip to Rosa that Chamberlain ("the most important man in Europe!") is coming round and Rosa tells Arny. They then crash the dinner party the Hitlers have prepared for Chamberlain."

March 02, 2012

What if Downton Abbey was a card game?

Magic: The Gathering cards, for Downton Abbey. Nerds. It’s here. We made Downton Abbey: The Gathering so you didn’t have to.

February 29, 2012

Trailer: Tim Riggins, Gladiator of Mars

February 28, 2012

Ze Frank is kickstarting another season of The Show

Amazing news. In 2006 I looked forward every day to the new episode. And my wife and I *still* sing songs from it, when appropriate. A Show with Ze Frank by Ze Frank — Kickstarter
Hi In 2006, I launched a show called "The Show With Ze Frank." It was one of the most strange, exciting, difficult, and amazing things I have done so far. I think it is time to do something similar, what with the economy in the crapper and the election coming up. If Newt can do it, so can I. So can we. Same Same but Different. Some things will be familiar. My face, my voice, politics, news, science, whatever else is happening in the world, the celebration of the spontaneous... and surprises. But the core of the original show was never really about what I did. It was about what you did. And I have no idea what is going to happen there. It's risky, unknown and awesome. I will be asking you to make things, to do things, and to surprise me. We will use the world as our playground and I have the technology to back it up. If I don't, I will make it. . . .

February 25, 2012

Trailer: Game of Thrones, season 2

February 23, 2012

Trailer: The Raid

Welsh director. Indonesia. Ties to Kung Fu Hustle and Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. Martial arts epic. The plot: a SWAT team storms a twenty-story apartment building ruled by a gangster. Mayhem ensues.

Meet the actual aristocrats who live in Downton Abbey

Long read. Royal read. Paris Review – The Aristocrats, Meredith Blake
Let it be known that Lady Fiona Herbert, the eighth Countess of Carnarvon, occasionally answers her own phone. When I call the Countess’s office to discuss her new book, Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey, I am unusually anxious; it’s not every day I speak to a member of the British aristocracy. “Hello?” answers a startled-sounding voice. I nervously ask if Lady Carnarvon is available. “This is Lady Carnarvon,” the voice replies, erupting into hearty laughter—which, happily, is not directed at me. The Countess had been reaching for the phone just as it rang and was caught off guard. “I’m completely useless as a receptionist,” she says. For a woman who lives at Highclere Castle, one of Britain’s most impressive “family piles,” as well as the primary setting of the spectacularly popular PBS costume drama Downton Abbey, Lady Carnarvon is surprisingly warm and unpretentious. She projects an image of slightly disheveled glamour: her household is not a well-oiled machine, but something more akin to a living archaeological site, where one might just discover a decades-old scrapbook while foraging through an out-of-use desk drawer. “We found a staircase recently. That was quite exciting,” she tells me. Downton Abbey isn’t Highclere’s first brush with fame—parts of Eyes Wide Shut were filmed there, and British tabloid curiosity Jordan celebrated her 2005 wedding at the castle, arriving via a pumpkin-shaped carriage—but the phenomenal success of the series has thrust the Carnarvon family’s ancestral home into the spotlight like never before. It’s also spawned a cottage industry of Downton Abbey tie-in books, including two competing biographies about Almina, the colorful and controversial fifth Countess of Carnarvon. . . .

February 16, 2012

How many of the 2012 Best Film nominees can pass the Bechdel test?

The Bechdel Test comes from Alison Bechdel's "Dykes to Watch Out For" comic strip (which has been sadly on hiatus forever). To pass the test a film must feature at least two named female characters that talk about something other than a man. It's surprising how many texts fail this.