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April 02, 2012

Trailer: Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom"

Looks great? I guess? Aaron Sorkin does the Will Olbermann story, basically. At first I was really hoping it was a remake of the groundbreaking-though-little-seen Canadian comedy The Newsroom, which is like the Office but done a decade earlier and also Canadian. But this will probably be okay too. Studio 60 was a total dog, but it had some bright spots, and as long as Sorkin isn't trying to write comedy sketches I think we're safe.

April 01, 2012

Why does cable TV cost so much? Sports.

'Dodgers tax' coming soon to a TV near you - latimes.com
Call it the "Dodgers tax." Pay-TV analysts expect Guggenheim Baseball Management, the investment group that paid an astronomical sum for the Dodgers, to recover at least part of its investment by charging a sky-high fee for the right to broadcast the team's games. With local stations and cable channels run by Time Warner Cable and News Corp. expected to get into a bidding war for those rights, the team is virtually guaranteed a multibillion-dollar contract — not unlike the one the Lakers won last year from Time Warner. Those dollars have to come from somewhere. That's where your monthly cable bill comes in. To recover its costs, the winning network is certain to demand more from cable operators, satellite TV and phone-based video services (and advertisers too, most likely). One estimate pegged the likely increase at $3.50 per home per month. That's on top of the more than $10 that sports channels already collect, and the estimated $3.50 that Time Warner is expected to seek for its Lakers programming. The insidious thing about these increases is that they're applied to just about everyone's pay-TV bill. The major sports networks are included in the same basic tier that offers the most popular advertiser-supported cable channels. Some consumer advocates have called for sports programming to be offered as a separate tier so the cost could be borne solely by sports fans, but the channels have fiercely resisted doing so because it would dramatically shrink their subscriber base. That, in turn, would yield less money to pay the likes of the new Dodgers owners and their star players. . . .

March 27, 2012

The D&D alignments of Christopher Walken

Mightygodking.com -- ALIGNMENT CHART! Christopher Walken

March 26, 2012

Trailer: Doctor Who season 7

March 17, 2012

Trailer: Prometheus

March 08, 2012

Trailer: Community season 3.5

Fuck yes this looks grand.

March 07, 2012

Shatner on how Patrick Stewart helped him overcome his Star Trek shame

Shatner just turned 81 and is touring with a one-man show that is his biography, essentially. This is an excerpt from his Fresh Air interview. William Shatner Interview: 'Shatner's World' : NPR
SHATNER: No, no. I had spent years doing "Star Trek" bits and things, and a lot of people loved it. A lot of people mocked it. A lot of people, you know, they did their various comic turns on "Star Trek." And I went with the joke, because - what? You're not going to go with the joke? At the time, the three years I spent, I applied every talent I had to making it valid and working on story and fighting management and doing the best I could. There were many, many talents who did that. I don't mean to take that away. All I'm saying is I did the best I could. So when I left "Star Trek," I left it with pride and went on to other things. And then "Star Trek" started to become popular about six years afterwards, as it went into syndication. And then people started talking about, hey, there's - beam me up, Scotty. And there's Captain Kirk. And, you know, and then somebody would say: Do you really go where no man has gone before - in that sort of semi-mocking tone that I thought, well, all right. Maybe it wasn't as good as I thought it was. And maybe I wasn't as good as I thought I was. And I held myself up defensively. It was only watching Patrick Stewart - and I have great respect for Patrick, both as an actor and as man. I love him. And the gravitas that this great Shakespearean actor gave to his role, that I suddenly realized that this guy is taking Captain Picard every bit as seriously as Macbeth. And I used to. And I stopped. And what the hell's the matter with me? It was a great piece of work. Everybody contributed to three years that has lasted 50. It's a phenomenon. Why aren't I proud of it? And that's when I had that moment.