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February 05, 2014

Don't read this if you still want to like Bill Cosby

Multiple women have come forward to charge Bill Cosby with drugging them and raping them. ​Who Wants to Remember Bill Cosby's Multiple Sex-Assault Accusations?
Who doesn't love Bill Cosby? I grew up watching Fat Albert and eating Jell-O Pudding Pops, which is a clich�, but Bill Cosby is the creator of some of our most warming and affirming clich�s. He is charming and iconic, one of the most culturally important and successful comedians ever, an elder statesman of the entertainment industry. He's also someone who has been accused by multiple women of drugging them and sexually assaulting them. Here is one of his accusers, describing an incident: Well, there were a number of people at the table, friends of his, and he said to me, yes, you do seem ill, you're slightly feverish, would you like to have some Contact? You know, the cold medicine. And I thought, why not, can't hurt. So he went into some sort of office area at the back of the restaurant and he produced two capsules in his hand. I thought nothing of it and I took the capsules. In about, I don't know, 20 to 30 minutes I felt great and then about 10 minutes after that I was almost literally face down on the table of this restaurant... He said, "Oh my, you must be more ill then we believed. I totally lost motor control; I was almost unable to hold my head up. I was very, very, very stoned. He took me into my apartment and then very helpfully and nicely was prepared to take off my clothes and help me into bed and pet me, and that's how the actual assault began. She recounted this in an on-camera interview, under her own name, with Matt Lauer of the Today show, on February 10, 2005. The assault had allegedly happened back in the 1970s, but she said she had decided to come forward because another woman had accused Cosby of committing a similar assault in January of 2004. At least thirteen women have come forward at this point. That woman, in a lawsuit, said that Cosby offered her three pills of what he claimed was "herbal medication, which would help her relax," and insisted she take all three

February 04, 2014

What do the fonts in 2001 tell us?

TYPESET IN THE FUTURE is a blog promising to look at the use of fonts in sci-fi films. I am 100% unironically excited about this. 2001: A Space Odyssey | Typeset In The Future

January 15, 2014

The best of ARCHER

ARCHER is one of those shows that is impossible for me to explain why it's great. I've tried. As soon as the word "spy" or "espionage" come out, people's eyes just glaze over. Or, y'know, they *already* watch the show and then correct me with a better pitch. Hey, fair enough. ARCHER started season five last night. It's a fantastic comedy. One of the funniest on tv right now. Check out this highlight reel and then go watch the first four seasons streaming and then maybe--MAYBE--we can be friends.

January 11, 2014

The true story behind the DALLAS BUYER'S CLUB

Woodroof wasn't an unlucky homophobe, he was really a bisexual man who'd had unsafe sex. The government never came after him. Corrupt doctors didn't bedevil him and he wasn't friends with a drag queen named Rayon. King of clubs
According to the movie, Ron Woodroof (played by Matthew McConaughey) was a hard-drinkin’, fast-lovin’, heavy-druggin’ homophobe whose reckless behavior resulted, quite by accident, in a diagnosis of AIDS by a caring physician (Jennifer Garner). At the time, doctors gave him about a month to live. But Ron was a fighter with a hardscrabble Texas spirit. He refused to cede to death. When he couldn’t find drugs in the U.S. market to stem the spread of his HIV, he sought them out in Mexico and Japan. When the Food and Drug Administration balked at his efforts to sell grey-market drugs (with the help of a drag queen named Rayon, played by Jared Leto), he established the Dallas Buyers Club: a members-only co-op where those who paid a fee could access the drugs he just “happened” to have. A lot of that never happened. There was no Rayon, no FDA raiding his business regularly, no corrupt doctors on the take to Big Pharma. He was not a homophobe either, according to those who knew him, but rather openly bisexual. And the doctor who was Woodroof’s primary care physician throughout much of his treatment wasn’t a woman, but Dr. Steven Pounders, who’s still in practice today. You might expect that Pounders, who met with the screenwriter more than three years ago to have his brain picked for details about Woodroof’s life, might object to being changed into a woman — even a beautiful one. But that’s not the case. Not at all. “It’s a movie, but it got a lot of very true facts [right],” he says. “Ron was doing all that stuff. He was diagnosed with AIDS — not even HIV, but AIDS — and had no T-cells. He was taking Peptide T [which is shown in the movie] and Compound Q [which was not]. He had this incredible ability to fit in, which is why it was accurate to present him as [pretending to be a priest] to carry drugs over the border. It does make a good story.” . . .