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Ian McKellan to star in remake of The Prisoner

Blog@Newsarama -- Off-topic: Caviezel, McKellen will star in AMC’s update of The Prisoner

This will be AMC's second original series after the sterling Mad Men.

All right, this has nothing to do with comics — unless you count the 1988 DC Comics sequel or Jack Kirby’s unpublished adaptation — but I’m a big fan of the surreal ’60s TV series The Prisoner, so I’m blogging about it: Cable network AMC has announced that Jim Caviezel and Ian McKellen will star in its six-part reinterpretation of the sci-fi classic.

If you’re unfamiliar with The Prisoner, it starred series creator Patrick McGoohan as an ex-British spy who’s held captive at a picturesque seaside village — called simply the Village — where he’s called Number Six and subjected to his captors’ attempts at brainwashing and interrogation. He repeatedly attempts to escape, but is often thwarted by the Village’s constant surveillance, and the menacing floating white ball dubbed the Rover.

The updated miniseries, a co-production from AMC, ITV Productions and Granada International, is set to debut in 2009. Caviezel will star as Number Six, while McKellen will play one of his captors, Number Two.

June 25, 2008

19 stellar cinematic one-scene wonders

Little more than a cameo: 19 stellar cinematic one-scene wonders | The A.V. Club

1. Alec Baldwin, Glengarry Glen Ross

Alec Baldwin's performance in Glengarry Glen Ross is the quintessential one-scene wonder. As an oily emissary from "downtown," Baldwin introduces a justly famous twist on the monthly sales contest for a contingent of sad-sack, Willy Loman-esque hucksters shilling dubious real-estate shares in Florida: First prize is a Cadillac El Dorado. Second prize is a set of steak knives. Third prize on down is, you're fired. Baldwin transforms one of David Mamet's most memorable monologues into a glorious symphony of verbal abuse, self-aggrandizement, shameless appeals to greed, and naked cruelty. He's capitalism's seething black heart, an economic hitman who enjoys his job way more than any non-sociopath should. Though he only appears in a single thundering, instantly iconic scene, he steals Glengarry Glen Ross from the lofty, Oscar-laden likes of Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon (in the role that inspired The Simpsons' Gil Gunderson), Ed Harris, Alan Arkin, Kevin Spacey, and Jonathan Pryce. Baldwin sinks his fangs into Mamet's brutally funny lines—added to the play especially for the movie—gleaning every last ounce of dick-swinging menace out of them.

June 18, 2008

DariLOL Argento

(postmodernbarney.com)

The whole film of "tenebre" as seen through a LOLcats filter.

I apologize for that headline.

June 12, 2008

Ira Glass asks, "How does Buffy feel?"

This American's life : NPR notable Ira Glass shares tricks to his trade : Culture : Station Break : Colorado Springs Independent : Colorado Springs

This is the element of This American Life that Glass calls the "How does Buffy feel?" moment. He says he picked up the phrase when listening to one of the writers for Buffy the Vampire Slayer walk the executive producer, Marti Noxon, through an episode.

Through the pitch he overheard all these things happen to Buffy. "And frankly, as a regular Buffy the Vampire Slayer watcher, it seemed perfectly good to me," says Glass.

But when the writer came to the end of his pitch, Noxon said, "You've gone through the trouble to create this incredible plot, but what does she feel about it? What does it do in her heart?"

Glass says that if a story doesn't have a "How does Buffy feel?" then he browbeats and cajoles the writer to put it in. Case in point: a recent story by Israeli writer Elad Keidan, whom Glass calls the Israeli Dave Eggers. Keidan recently won first prize in the Cannes Film Festival student competition.

The story Keidan submitted to Glass is about an insatiable liar who ends up in a world where all his lies have come true. But, Glass says, "weirdly, you get to the end of the story and there's no stakes. His heart doesn't sink enough." So, he sent Keidan a page-long e-mail suggesting two places where Keidan should put in another sentence letting the character feel something, including Glass' own speculations on what he might feel.

June 11, 2008

The Unused Original Script of "Lost"

McSweeney's Internet Tendency: The Opening Act From the Original, Unused Teleplay of Lost's Pilot Episode.

JACK: OK, everyone, gather round. I'm Jack. We crashed on this island. I'm kind of an alcoholic, and I had a really complicated relationship with my father, Christian, who was also an alcoholic.

CLAIRE: Christian Shepherd? That's my dad, too!

JACK: No way!

SAWYER: Oh, yeah, I know that guy, too. I met him at a bar. He's proud of you.

JACK: You met my dad?

SAWYER: Yeah, I met him right before I killed this guy I thought had ruined my life as a child. He was a con man who went by "Sawyer" and had an affair with my mother and then my dad found out and killed her and himself. It was ugly.

LOCKE: No way! That sounds just like my dad! He stole my kidney and then paralyzed me.

KATE: Paralyzed people can't walk.

LOCKE: Don't tell me what I can't do! I can walk now, obviously. I think this island is magic or something crazy like that.

. . .