1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110  |  111  |  112  |  113  |  114  |  115  |  116  |  117  |  118  |  119  |  120  |  121  |  122  |  123  |  124  |  125  |  126  |  127  |  128  |  129  |  130  |  131  |  132  |  133  |  134  |  135  |  136  |  137  |  138  |  139  |  140  |  141  |  142  |  143  |  144  |  145  |  146  |  147  |  148  |  149  |  150  |  151  |  152  |  153  |  154  |  155  |  156  |  157  |  158  |  159  |  160  |  161  |  162  |  163  |  164  |  165  |  166  |  167  |  168  |  169  |  170  |  171  |  172  |  173  |  174  |  175  |  176  |  177  |  178  |  179  |  180  |  181  |  182  |  183  |  184  |  185  |  186  |  187  |  188  |  189  |  190  |  191  |  192  |  193  |  194  |  195  |  196  |  197  |  198  |  199  |  200  |  201  |  202  |  203  |  204  |  205  |  206  |  207  |  208  |  209  |  210  |  211  |  212  |  213  |  214  |  215  |  216  |  217  |  218  |  219  |  220  |  221  |  222  |  223  |  224  |  225  |  226  |  227  |  228  |  229  |  230  |  231  |  232  |  233  |  234  |  235  |  236  |  237  |  238  |  239  |  240  |  241  |  242  |  243  |  244  |  245  |  246  |  247  |  248  |  249  |  250  |  251  |  252  |  253  |  254  |  255  |  256  |  257  |  258  |  259  |  260  |  261  |  262  |  263  |  264  |  265  |  266  |  267  |  268  |  269  |  270  |  271  |  272  |  273  |  274  |  275  |  276  |  277  |  278  |  279  |  280  |  281  |  282  |  283  |  284  |  285  |  286  |  287  |  288  |  289  |  290  |  291  |  292  |  293  |  294  |  295  |  296  |  297  |  298  |  299  |  300  |  301  |  302  |  303  |  304  |  305  |  306  |  307  |  308  |  309  |  310  |  311  |  312  |  313  |  314  |  315  |  316  |  317  |  318  |  319  |  320  |  321  |  322  |  323  |  324  |  325  |  326  |  327  |  328  |  329  |  330  |  331  |  332  |  333  |  334  |  335  |  336  |  337  |  338  |  339  |  340  |  341  |  342  |  343  |  344  |  345  |  346  |  347  |  348  |  349  |  350  |  351  |  352  |  353  |  354  |  355  |  356  |  357  |  358  |  359  |  360  |  361  |  362  |  363  |  364  |  365  |  366  |  367  |  368  |  369  |  370  |  371  |  372  |  373  |  374  |  375  |  376  |  377  |  378  |  379  |  380  |  381  |  382  |  383  |  384  |  385  |  386  |  387  |  388  |  389  |  390  |  391  |  392  |  393  |  394  |  395  |  396  |  397  |  398  |  399  |  400  |  401  |  402  |  403  |  404  |  405  |  406  |  407  |  408  |  409  |  410  |  411  |  412  |  413  |  414  |  415  |  416  |  417  |  418  |  419  |  420  |  421  |  422  |  423  |  424  |  425  |  426  |  427  |  428  |  429  |  430  |  431  |  432  |  433  |  434  |  435  |  436  |  437  |  438  |  439  |  440  |  441  |  442  |  443  |  444  |  445  |  446  |  447  |  448  |  449  |  450  |  451  |  452  |  453  |  454  |  455  |  456  |  457  |  458  |  459  |  460  |  461  |  462  |  463  |  464  |  465  |  466  |  467  |  468  |  469  |  470  |  471  |  472  |  473  |  474  |  475  |  476  |  477  |  478  |  479  |  480  |  481  |  482  |  483  |  484  |  485  |  486  |  487  |  488  |  489  |  490  |  491  |  492  |  493  |  494  |  495  |  496  |  497  |  498  |  499  |  500  |  501  |  502  |  503  |  504  |  505  |  506  |  507  |  508  |  509  |  510  |  511  |  512  |  513  |  514  |  515  |  516  |  517  |  518  |  519  |  520  |  521  |  522  |  523  |  524  |  525  |  526  |  527  |  528  |  529  |  530  |  531  |  532  |  533  |  534  |  535  |  536  |  537  |  538  |  539  |  540  |  541  |  542  |  543  |  544  |  545  |  546  |  547  |  548  |  549  |  550  |  551  |  552  |  553  |  554  |  555  |  556  |  557  |  558  |  559  |  560  |  561  |  562  |  563  |  564  |  565  |  566  |  567  |  568  |  569  |  570  |  571  |  572  |  573  |  574  |  575  |  576  |  577  |  578  |  579  |  580  |  581  |  582  |  583  |  584  |  585  |  586  |  587  |  588  |  589  |  590  |  591  |  592  |  593  |  594  |  595  |  596  |  597  |  598  |  599  |  600  |  601  |  602  |  603  |  604  |  605  |  606  |  607  |  608  |  609  |  610  |  611  |  612  |  613  |  614  |  615  |  616  |  617  |  618  |  619  |  620  |  621  |  622  |  623  |  624  |  625  |  626  |  627  |  628  |  629  |  630  |  631  |  632  |  633  |  634  |  635  |  636  |  637  |  638  |  639  |  640  |  641  |  642  |  643  |  644  |  645  |  646  |  647  |  648  |  649  |  650  |  651  |  652  |  653  |  654  |  655  |  656  |  657  |  658  |  659  |  660  |  661  |  662  |  663  |  664  |  665  |  666  |  667  |  668  |  669  |  670 

May 06, 2012

Is this the end of the internship scam?

An internship, by law, has to be primarily educational and not just unpaid labor replicating the work of what a paid employee would do. Of course, no one actually follows that law instead most folks that have interns treat them as they would ordinary employees at what used to be the entry-level of employment. A rash of class action lawsuits against some of the biggest scofflaws might bring this golden age of unpaid labor to an end. Hallelujah. The litigant being profiled here was an unpaid intern being forced to work 55-hour weeks, often without a meal break, while supervising a team of other unpaid interns. This isn't career advancement, it's a scam. Internships: The Beginning of the End of Interns Without Wages | Moneyland | TIME.com
“I was so determined to make this one really worth my while,” says the 28-year-old Wang, who moved from Columbus, Ohio, to New York, where she was living with her boyfriend (also working as an unpaid intern at one point) and living off of her savings. “I knew I couldn’t do anymore internships after this.” As it turned out, Wang’s internship was just like many of the thousands of others: unrewarding in terms of both pay and marketable experience — not to mention the lack of a job offer. In fact, the only difference between her internship and most others was what happened about a month after it ended. Wang sued. On Feb. 1, the law firm Outten & Golden filed a class-action lawsuit against the Hearst Corporation, which owns Harper’s Bazaar, on behalf of Wang and any other unpaid and underpaid intern who worked at the company over the past six years. The lawsuit alleges that, among other things, Hearst violated federal and state labor laws by having Wang work as many as 55 hours a week without compensation. “It was disgusting,” says Wang, referring to her unpaid daily responsibilities like shipping hats between New York and London for $350 each way, not being able to eat lunch until 4 p.m., routinely shuttling heavy bags around Manhattan and working to 10 p.m. with no break for dinner – all while supervising eight other interns. “Thinking of the spring interns who would come in with high hopes just like my fellow interns and I had — I decided that someone had to put a stop to this practice, which was going to go on forever and get worse before it got better.”

May 04, 2012

This Day in Labor History: May 4, 1886 -- The Haymarket Square Riot

The men convicted and hanged for the Haymarket bombing were likely innocent. The police had no evidence and six of the men were nowhere near the riot. No one knows who threw the bomb. The police didn't care. They just rounded up the local heads of the labor movement and railroaded them all the way to the gallows. This Day in Labor History: May 4, 1886 - Lawyers, Guns & Money : Lawyers, Guns & Money
On March 4, 1886, during a protest march against police brutality in Chicago’s Haymarket Square, a bomb went off in the middle of a group of policemen, killing 7 officers. The aftermath of the Haymarket bombing showed the fear American capitalists had of working-class ideologies, the lack of civil liberties during the Gilded Age, and the tenuousness of labor organizations during these years of class formation. The mid-1880s saw the native-born working class struggling to understand the new labor system of the Gilded Age. With the promises of mutually respectful employer-employee relations at the center of early Republican free labor ideology shown to be a farce and workers living increasing desperate lives in dirty and dangerous factories and condemned to poverty, the American working-class sought to even the playing field between employer and employee. The Knights of Labor promised the eight-hour day; in a period when labor looked for a single panacea to solve all problems rather than a deep class analysis of labor-employer relations, the working-class jumped to the idea. The Knights, led by Terence Powderly, grew rapidly in the mid-1880s, even though Powderly didn’t really envision the organization as a radical challenge to capitalism. Still, “Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Sleep, Eight Hours for What You Will” became the slogan for a million or more Americans. But Powderly’s control over the organization was tenuous and with the Knights defined as open to all workers, it meant that anarchists and other radicals could easily join and then try to convert workers to their cause. The center of 8-hour organizing was in Chicago, where small numbers of radicals began organizing workers to demand the 8-hour day and threaten a general strike if denied. On May 1, 1886, between 300,000 and 500,000 workers walked off their job around the nation. Probably 80,000 of those workers were in Chicago. The police responded with sadly predictable violence. On May 3, police murdered 6 strikers at the McCormick Harvesting Machine plant. The McCormick workers had been battling with their employer for a year, who had hired Pinkertons to beat them. They combined their already existing struggle with the 8-hour day to become some of the most respected working-class militants in the city. Responding to the murders, labor called a march to protest police violence the next day at Haymarket Square, which somewhere between 1000-3000 people attended. . . .