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The Dunning-Kruger effect

Dunning–Kruger effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia aka “ The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.”
— Bertrand Russell
The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which "people reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices but their incompetence robs them of the metacognitive ability to realize it".[1] The unskilled therefore suffer from illusory superiority, rating their own ability as above average, much higher than in actuality; by contrast, the highly skilled underrate their abilities, suffering from illusory inferiority. This leads to a perverse result where less competent people will rate their own ability higher than more competent people. It also explains why actual competence may weaken self-confidence because competent individuals falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. "Thus, the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others."

April 16, 2010

Pull on Your Hazmat Suit and Call Authorities Before Picking Up those Roadside Returnables

Just as a preface: There is no meth epidemic. Reliable...

April 15, 2010

These were a few of his favorite things . . .

The words David Foster Wallace circled in his dictionary. -...

April 13, 2010

Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit: I hate the spelling of your name, but I love you

Fahrenheit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia According to a journal...

April 12, 2010

What the Hell *WAS* the Cause of the Civil War?

One Last Thought On McDonnell And Confederate History - National...

Continue reading "What the Hell *WAS* the Cause of the Civil War?" »

April 11, 2010

UPDATE: North-American Scrabble un-ruined; dave-o will continue to get schooled on the 15x15 torturegrid

Updating our post of a week ago, "SCRABBLE OFFICIALLY CHANGING...

April 02, 2010

Decades before Kinsey, Clelia Mosher surveyed the sex lives of Victorian women

STANFORD Magazine: March/April 2010 > Features > Clelia Mosher She interviewed many, many women asking qualitative questions but ended up burying her report. It was recently uncovered in the Standford archives. The gist of is this: Victorian ladies got their corseted freak on a lot, felt guilty about it. But she accomplished much more than that. She pioneered many studies, did amazing things. Please read this article, it's kind of amazing.
. . . Degler nearly put it aside, figuring it was a manuscript for one of Mosher's published works, mostly statistical treatises on women's height, strength and menstruation. But instead, he recalls, "I opened it up and there were these questionnaires"— questionnaires upon which dozens of women, most born before 1870, had inscribed their most intimate thoughts. In other words, it was a sex survey. A Victorian sex survey. It is the earliest known study of its type, long preceding, for example, the 1947 and 1953 Kinsey Reports, whose oldest female respondents were born in the 1890s. The Mosher Survey recorded not only women's sexual habits and appetites, but also their thinking about spousal relationships, children and contraception. Perhaps, it hinted, Victorian women weren't so Victorian after all. . . . Slightly more than half of these educated women claimed to have known nothing of sex prior to marriage; the better informed said they'd gotten their information from books, talks with older women and natural observations like "watching farm animals." Yet no matter how sheltered they'd initially been, these women had—and enjoyed—sex. Of the 45 women, 35 said they desired sex; 34 said they had experienced orgasms; 24 felt that pleasure for both sexes was a reason for intercourse; and about three-quarters of them engaged in it at least once a week. Unlike Mosher's other work, the survey is more qualitative than quantitative, featuring open-ended questions probing feelings and experiences. "She's actually asking these questions not about physiology or mechanics—she's really asking about sexual subjectivity and the meaning of sex to women," Freedman says. Their responses were often mixed. Some enjoyed sex but worried that they shouldn't. One slept apart from her husband "to avoid temptation of too frequent intercourse." Some didn't enjoy sex but faulted their partner. Mosher writes: [She] "Thinks men have not been properly trained." . . .
*via Violet Blue*