1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  15  |  16  |  17  |  18  |  19  |  20  |  21  |  22  |  23  |  24  |  25  |  26  |  27  |  28  |  29  |  30  |  31  |  32  |  33  |  34  |  35  |  36  |  37  |  38  |  39  |  40  |  41  |  42  |  43  |  44  |  45  |  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  |  57  |  58  |  59  |  60  |  61  |  62  |  63  |  64  |  65  |  66  |  67  |  68  |  69  |  70  |  71  |  72  |  73  |  74  |  75  |  76  |  77  |  78  |  79  |  80  |  81  |  82  |  83  |  84  |  85  |  86  |  87  |  88  |  89  |  90  |  91  |  92  |  93  |  94  |  95  |  96  |  97  |  98  |  99  |  100  |  101  |  102  |  103  |  104  |  105  |  106  |  107  |  108  |  109  |  110  |  111  |  112  |  113  |  114  |  115  |  116  |  117  |  118  |  119  |  120  |  121 

November 17, 2010

The monkey in the second part of this video is a total jerk

November 16, 2010

The secret history of America's Nazi safehaven

After the war, the U.S. took in hundreds of Nazis and hid them across America. Mostly they were scientists, or monsters. The U.S. also persecuted and deported people who came looking for these secreted Nazis. Nazis Were Given ‘Safe Haven’ in U.S., Report Says - NYTimes.com
WASHINGTON — A secret history of the United States government’s Nazi-hunting operation concludes that American intelligence officials created a “safe haven” in the United States for Nazis and their collaborators after World War II, and it details decades of clashes, often hidden, with other nations over war criminals here and abroad. The 600-page report, which the Justice Department has tried to keep secret for four years, provides new evidence about more than two dozen of the most notorious Nazi cases of the last three decades. It describes the government’s posthumous pursuit of Dr. Josef Mengele, the so-called Angel of Death at Auschwitz, part of whose scalp was kept in a Justice Department official’s drawer; the vigilante killing of a former Waffen SS soldier in New Jersey; and the government’s mistaken identification of the Treblinka concentration camp guard known as Ivan the Terrible. The report catalogs both the successes and failures of the band of lawyers, historians and investigators at the Justice Department’s Office of Special Investigations, which was created in 1979 to deport Nazis. . . .

Kate Middleton will be the first educated woman and first commoner to marry into the British royal family

Okay, first commoner in 400+ years to marry into the family. Kate Middleton: Affluent commoner with coal-miner lineage, future...
Middleton comes from working-class family background—not the norm for royal spouses-to-be. In fact, Middleton is the first “non-blueblood” to marry a future British monarch since the 1600s, the New York Post reports. Also different about this queen-to-be is the fact that she is a college graduate—a first for female spouses of British royalty.

November 15, 2010

Nature, is there no end to your damn freakiness?

BBC News - Some dinosaurs pole-vaulted into the air to...

November 02, 2010

"The Lampshade that Drives its Owners Mad" (not about a goofy life-of-the-party guy)

The lampshade that drives its owners mad: Strange truth...

Continue reading ""The Lampshade that Drives its Owners Mad" (not about a goofy life-of-the-party guy)" »

October 30, 2010

"Sexy Pencil" actually a pretty damn good costume

YouTube - Sexy Pencil Someone tell the Giant Squid to...

October 20, 2010

Mayan calendar interpretation likely very wrong, world will not end in 2012

End of the Earth Postponed - Yahoo! News
A new critique, published as a chapter in the new textbook "Calendars and Years II: Astronomy and Time in the Ancient and Medieval World" (Oxbow Books, 2010), argues that the accepted conversions of dates from Mayan to the modern calendar may be off by as much as 50 or 100 years. That would throw the supposed and overhyped 2012 apocalypse off by decades and cast into doubt the dates of historical Mayan events. (The doomsday worries are based on the fact that the Mayan calendar ends in 2012, much as our year ends on Dec. 31.) The Mayan calendar was converted to today's Gregorian calendar using a calculation called the GMT constant, named for the last initials of three early Mayanist researchers. Much of the work emphasized dates recovered from colonial documents that were written in the Mayan language in the Latin alphabet, according to the chapter's author, Gerardo Aldana, University of California, Santa Barbara professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies. Later, the GMT constant was bolstered by American linguist and anthropologist Floyd Lounsbury, who used data in the Dresden Codex Venus Table, a Mayan calendar and almanac that charts dates relative to the movements of Venus. . . .