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January 19, 2012

How-to: Hands-only CPR in about a minute

I've got it on good word from legit medical folk...

Continue reading "How-to: Hands-only CPR in about a minute" »

January 02, 2012

Helluva good argument for taking a walk

Don't write this off as facile advice; it's really worth...

December 19, 2011

Why do more people die when the economy is booming?

This research suggests it's because no one wants to work in nursing homes. Overcoming Bias : Why Boom Times Kill
We find that most of the additional deaths that occur during times of economic growth are among the elderly, particularly elderly women. … Cyclicality is especially strong for deaths occurring in nursing homes, and is stronger in states where a higher fraction of the elderly reside in nursing homes. … Staffing in skilled nursing facilities moves counter-cyclically. A typical estimate suggests that a one-percentage point increase in a state’s unemployment rate leads to a 0.54% reduction in that state’s mortality rate. … Deaths by motor vehicle accidents are associated with the largest coefficient estimate. … It is likely that motor vehicle deaths fluctuate because people drive more during strong economic times. … Approximately 80 percent of the averted respiratory deaths are among those over age 60. … Virtually all of the additional cardiovascular deaths are among those over age 65. … The correlation between changes in hospital employment and changes in aggregate employment is strongly negative (-0.90). … Nursing homes experience especially severe shortages of nursing aides when the economy is strong. … Between 70 to 90% of home health care agencies and nursing homes indicate shortages of direct care workers. … Nursing home deaths are associated with an estimated [unemployment rate] coefficient that is an order of magnitude larger than the coefficient that is estimated among deaths taking place elsewhere. …

Cunning, cunning humans: Japanese grid multiplication

So, in college I knew this guy KC (aka "The...

December 16, 2011

And then there was that time a Wikipedia editor created an entire fake war

And of course the war was in Michigan. This is seriously a ton of work. Kudos. User:Ned Scott/Upper Peninsula War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Upper Peninsula War (1843-1844; also known as the Canadian - Michigan War) was the conflict between the State of Michigan and Canada over a disputed territorial line in the Upper Peninsula, which led to a secession attempt by the governor of Michigan, Epaphroditus Ransom. The boundary dispute arose out of ambiguous and conflicting mappings of the region, which set the St. Mary’s River through, what is known now as the Upper Peninsula. Governor Ransom feared that the Canadian government would attempt to reclaim sovereignty over the Upper Peninsula. He also feared threats from U.S. President John Tyler to remove him from office. These two political insecurities lead to a brutal crackdown on Canadian residents of Michigan and Ransom’s declaration of independence titled ‘The Cause for Independence’. The Upper Peninsula is bordered by Northern Wisconsin, Lake Superior, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan The disputed boundary line was set shortly after the War of 1812. During the war of 1812 British Troops captured what was then the Michigan Territory and sovereignty of the territory was briefly returned to Upper Canada. Control of the territory was only restored to the United States after the Treaty of Ghent, which implemented the policy of “Status Quo Ante Bellum” or “Just as Things Were Before the War”. However, true sovereignty of the Upper Peninsula and the islands in the St. Clair River remained contested. After Michigan was awarded the Upper Peninsula as a consolation for its losses in the Toledo War, the issue of sovereignty was reignited. In 1840, when large mineral deposits (copper and iron) were discovered in the area, French-Canadians began to migrate to the region en masse. Some French-Canadian separatists began to secretly fund the new immigrants to the region – organizing them into regional militias. Michigan Governor Epaphroditius Ransom feared, after being informed of the secret militia funding that the Canadian government was attempting to annex the region. On February 26, 1843, Governor Ransom mobilized a militia force to move into the region. He ordered the militia commanders to crack down on all Canadian citizens and secure the Upper Peninsula borders against a full-fledged Canadian incursion. This troop mobilization lead to a brutal crackdown in the Upper Peninsula – specifically in the towns of St. Ignace (on the south-western edge) and Rudyard (on the eastern border). The conflict was only ended with the capture of Governor Ransom by federal troops on April 1, 1843. . . .

December 13, 2011

This Modern World presents Fun Facts About Newt Gingrich

December 07, 2011

This isn't a joke; art is a serious problem, people

I've never really talked about this, but both my...