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I never knew St. Augustine was African

Most likely a Berber, if you want to get specific. It's a shame so much art portrays him as just another white dude with a beard. The Rest of Sunday: St. Augustine Was A Black Man
Because he has had such an impact on the Western world, it is quite understandable that almost every available portrait has depicted him as a white man. The portrait to the left I took from Wikipedia. According to Carl F. Ellis Jr., however, the portraits are inaccurate. Ellis writes about the Gospel in Africa: "Great early scholars like Augustine, Tertullian and Origen were Black men from Africa. Augustine was a major influence on John Calvin. So the Reformation theologians have the African church to thank for a great deal of their theology." He adds in a foot note: "Scholars B.F. Wright and M. A. Smith have confirmed that Augustine was born of African parents. Actually, Augustine, Tertullian and Origen were brown North Africans and not Black sub-Saharan Africans. They have been classified as Caucasian by some. However, if these men had been Americans they would have been classified as Black, and it is the American classification that I use here." As I sit here, I am asking myself, Why are you writing this post? After some thought, I have a few reasons. First, most portraits of a man that we both revere and reference do not represent the truth. Second, as I learn about African-American history, I learn more about my brothers and sisters who are [ethnically speaking] different than I am. Learning more helps me to love more. Third, it helps me stay away from the racial superiority complex that pervades our culture. When seeing the African-American culture in its broader historical context, we learn that in every culture there are both areas to serve and to be served. I am reminded of the movie Radio. The town thought they were serving him, but it was Radio who was changing the town.

January 28, 2013

The population of the United States as measured in Canadas

MAP

January 23, 2013

UPDATE: Your Calamari Is Almost Certainly *Not* a Pig's Rectum

Like many blogs, we linked last week to one of...

January 14, 2013

Sometimes calamari is just a pig's asshole

You're welcome. Is That Calamari Or Pig Rectum? : Gothamist
A recent episode of This American Life explored the theme of Doppelgangers, and by far the most sensational segment hinged on a report that pig rectum was being sold as imitation calamari. A reporter for the show, Ben Calhoun, got a tip about a farmer "with some standing in the pork industry" who is in charge of "a pork producing operation that spans several states." One fine day this farmer was visiting a pork processing plant in Oklahoma, and noticed boxes stacked on the floor labeled "artificial calamari." Asked what that meant, the plant's manager, his friend, replied, "Bung. It's hog rectum." For clarity, Calhoun adds, "Rectum that would be sliced into rings, deep fried, and boom, there you have it." Mmmmm, rectum. "It's payback for our blissful ignorance about where our food comes from," Calhoun theorizes, and in the course of his fascinating report, he spoke with the farmer, who confirmed the story but declined to go on record about the incident—because his girlfriend warned him about his name being linked to pig rectum in Google searches. Smart man. But the plant's manager, Ron Meek, did agree to speak on record. He claimed he never personally saw the label "artificial calamari" but that's what he was told by the people he worked for. And in an interview, his bosses backed the assertion that pig rectum was being sold for use as imitation calamari. They just couldn't say where. Bung, by the way, is the industry term for the product, which This American Life describes in nauseating detail. But if you eat sausages, you shouldn't be too grossed out, because chances are you've enjoyed bung, among other things, on more than one occasion. As for the calamari question, the plant manager wouldn't say what happened to the bung once it got out the door—they ship a lot of it to Asia. Obviously it would be illegal in America to serve pork rectum and call it calamari, and the USDA says they've never heard of anyone trying to pass pork bung as squid.
Poor Mojo's Newswire: UPDATE: Your Calamari Is Almost Certainly *Not* a Pig's Rectum

January 10, 2013

In which we are reminded that a gun is an instrument, not a tool

Proof that Concealed Carry permit holders live in a dream...