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March 08, 2013

5 Shockingly Advanced Ancient Buildings That Shouldn't Exist

These are all mind-blowing, but especially to me the dam that lasted 1,000 years. 5 Shockingly Advanced Ancient Buildings That Shouldn't Exist | Cracked.com
Derinkuyu's underground city was discovered in the 1960s in Turkey, when a modern house above ground was being renovated. Much to the relief of everyone present, the 18-story underground city was abandoned and not swarming with mole people. Hidden for centuries right under everyone's noses, Derinkuyu is just the largest of hundreds of underground complexes built by we're-not-sure-who-exactly around the eighth century B.C. To understand just what's so phenomenal about this feat of engineering, imagine someone handing you a hammer and chisel and telling you to go dig out a system of underground chambers capable of sustaining 20,000 people. And not one of those fancy modern chisels, either -- we're talking about something dug with whatever excavating tools they had 2,800 years ago. The city was probably used as a giant bunker to protect its inhabitants from either war or natural disaster, but its architects were clearly determined to make it the most comfortable doomsday bunker ever. It had access to fresh flowing water -- the wells were not connected with the surface to prevent poisoning by crafty land dwellers. It also has individual quarters, shops, communal rooms, tombs, arsenals, livestock, and escape routes. There's even a school, complete with a study room.

March 07, 2013

UPDATE: Even When Bloggers Are Bad at Math, Global Climate Change Is Still a Reality

Late in 2012 we--along with most of the pinko-hippie blogosphere--posted...

March 06, 2013

The Phoenix Program: America's secret torture program in the Vietnam War

Apropos of today's revelations about the extent of America's involvement in Iraqi torture comes this wiki article about the ancestor of those Petraeus-run torture farms. Over 80,000 Vietnamese people were tortured by us in Vietnam. And about a third of them were murdered afterwards. By our people. By us. And these weren't combatants. There weren't soldiers. These were just plain folks we decided we should spend tax money on seeing how many live rats we could stuff up inside them before they died. Phoenix Program - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Phoenix Program (Vietnamese: Chiến dịch Phụng Ho�ng, a word related to fenghuang, the Chinese phoenix) was a program designed, coordinated, and executed by the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), United States special operations forces, special forces operatives from the Australian Army Training Team Vietnam (AATTV),[1] and the Republic of Vietnam's (South Vietnam) security apparatus during the Vietnam War. Original unissued patch The Program was designed to identify and "neutralize" (via infiltration, capture, terrorism, torture, and assassination) the infrastructure of the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (NLF or Viet Cong).[2][3][4][5] Historian Douglas Valentine states that "Central to Phoenix is the fact that it targeted civilians, not soldiers".[6] The major two components of the program were Provincial Reconnaissance Units (PRUs) and regional interrogation centers. PRUs would kill and capture suspected VC. They would also capture civilians who were thought to have information on VC activities. Many of these civilians were then taken to the interrogation centers where some were tortured in an attempt to gain intelligence on VC activities in the area.[7] Few of the prisoners survived—most of them were tortured to death, and those that survived the torture sessions were generally killed afterwards.[8] The information extracted at the centers was then given to military commanders, who would use it to task the PRU with further capture and assassination missions.[7] The program was in operation between 1965 and 1972, and similar efforts existed both before and after that period. By 1972, Phoenix operatives had "neutralized" 81,740 suspected NLF operatives, informants and supporters, of whom 26,369 were killed.[9]

March 05, 2013

New Thing to Worry About: Giant Robo-Dog What Throws the Cinder Blocks!

Unofficial Poor Mojo's Military Correspondent (and Constant Mojoketeer) Milt draws...